How to disable Exchange in SBS 2003

I would like to disable Exchange ins SBS 2003 and use a different mail server application. What would be the best way to achieve this?
Possibly without getting alerts for the exchange services not running.
co_olAsked:
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Lee W, MVPConnect With a Mentor Technology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
If you want a stable server, you cannot disable Exchange.  SBS has been tuned to operate effectively and reliably when it's run as it's intended.  Disabling Exchange is a MAJOR change to how it should be run.  Exchange used for a variety of things.  What is it about exchange you are unhappy with?

This other mail server - how are you planning on backing up the e-mail of your staff.
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Michael WorshamInfrastructure / Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Simply disable the Exchange services. Keep in mind though, that you won't be able to receive Alerts and Performance reports.
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co_olAuthor Commented:
Basically I have a customer that wants to use a mail, fax server applicatoin called David.zehn. I would have to install and support the software. Currently I going to run up a trial version on my test server at home to sort of evaluate it.
The new mail server app is a total package and has an encrypted backup solution called strongbox.

What sort of implication should I expect disabling exchange?

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Michael WorshamInfrastructure / Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Are you going to run said mail/fax server application on a different box? If so, you can keep Exchange enabled (thus allowing reporting and alerts to take place), but just divert SMTP port from your firewall over to your new mail/fax server.
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franked_itCommented:
In the Server Managment Administrative tool you should be able to remove the Exchange Server task.  If it's not there, then in the Add/Remove Software you should be able to change the SBS installation and remove that component.  It may have been in the Add/Remove Windows components part of the Add/Remove Programs control panel.  

I did this once a while ago when running Exchange on the same box was too much of a resource drain, and we had to move it to another computer but I don't remember exactly which of these wizards it was.

Performing it this way should not render the SBS server unstable.  Just disabling the services, or removing the executables for example, would not be a wise idea.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
So why does he have Small Business Server - it already provides all those functions and is a common, EASILY supported application.  What about this other app is so special.

What problems?  I suspect your backups of e-mail are, at best, going to be more complicated - if not next to impossible depending on the way the staff works.  You'll have issues with using outlook because it WANTS to use the Exchange server.  You'll not receive the status reports.  You're probably going to break the wizards used for creating user accounts.  

SBS was intended to be used a specific way.  IF he doesn't want to use it that way, you better be prepared for a lot more service calls - and they better be prepared to pay you a lot more money in the long term -- or deal with little problems growing bigger over time.  I can't say exactly what you're looking at or when because I've never NOT used exchange for an SBS setup in some manner.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
I've had this conversation before... http:Q_21896782.html and I totally agree with leew.  Why would you try to deploy a 3rd party solution in place of a native one that works incredibly well, and is completely intertwined with SBS?

Contrary to what is said above by franked_it, you cannot uninstall Exchange from an SBS without breaking many of it's features and benefits.  (and just for the record, moving Exchange to a different server because it was too much of a resource drain isn't really a valid solution... becausse that would cost significantly more than upgrading the SBS's hardware, since it would require totally separate licensing and CALs).

You really haven't answered leew's question though, about what specifically you think this other program will do for you that Exchange doesn't do.  If you can provide an answer for that, perhaps we can help guide you a solution that is much more effective and doesn't throw a wrench into your SBS's gut.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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franked_itCommented:
Looks like David.Zehn is a unified messaging platform and adds a ton of integration points.  Exchange can do much of this, but it gets expensive, and I don't know how SBS will handle that kind of extra features and load.

SBS provides a great, integrated, well-tested and supported platform, but it definitely has its limitations.  Yes, there will be much more to manage if a third-party messaging system is used, and the end-client should be made to understand this.
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franked_itCommented:
Here's the link to more information on the software:
http://www.tobit.com/login/mrd.asp?CategoryID=149&ff=1



***Edited by TechSoEasy -- EE's Microsoft Zone Advisor***
And for those of use who are a bit German challenged... go here first to set your language:
http://www.tobit.com/
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
franked_it...

"Exchange can do much of this, but it gets expensive, and I don't know how SBS will handle that kind of extra features and load"

I don't know where you are getting your information from, but why would it get expensive?  Exchange is FREE when you already have SBS.  David.Zehn costs a few thousand dollars for more than 5 users.

And what specifically does David.Zehn do that Exchange doesn't.   Because Exchange is a unified messaging platform as well, and it also has a ton of integration points, which don't even need to be configured manually when deployed on SBS because it's done automatically by SBS's configuration tools.

If you are going to make such a claim... how about backing it up with some facts and figures?

Jeff
TechSoEasy

 
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kieran_bCommented:
>>I would like to disable Exchange ins SBS 2003 and use a different mail server application. What would be the best way to achieve this?

Go back to whoever sold you the server and say that you have incorrectly purchased your server software, and that you want to switch to Windows 2003 Standard with CALs.

Disabling Exchange in SBS is like installing an electric engine on the hood of your car - a novel idea, but remarkably stupid at the same time ;)
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I don't know what your background is franked_it (I checked your profile but see you didn't fill it out).  I've worked in large (1000+ user environment) and in small (3 user) environments.  An exchange server can easily handle hundreds of users - in that large environment we had Exchange running on 900 MHz systems with hundreds of users on it.  SBS has a limit of 75 users.  And today's hardware is a lot more advanced than it was when Exchange 2000 was on those 900 MHz servers with hundreds of users (and Exchange 2003 did not raise the resource requirement bar THAT much).  

The point is, a properly configured SBS server will handle 75 users with no significant performance issues - especially on today's hardware as opposed to the hardware that was available at the time SBS was released, roughly 4 years ago.  

You may really know your stuff... in an enterprise - I certainly did... but I ROYALLY messed up my first SBS install.  SBS is NOT Windows Server 2003 and should not be managed or thought of in the same way with quite the same restrictions.  If you're an enterprise guy, you're almost better off FORGETTING everything you know and start from scratch with SBS.

I looked up that program and agree - WHY would you spend even more money on a system that doesn't integrate nearly as neatly as Exchange, especially considering you have all you need for Exchange.  You need a CAL for each user/device in SBS anyway -- and that CAL provides exchange access as well as Outlook.  I really see no point in using another product that has a high list price (I thought it might be open source at first... but clearly it's not) unless there's some groundbreaking, all-important feature that Exchange lacks that you simply have to have.
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franked_itCommented:
Jeff,
I don't intend to start a battle over this.  I'm going to stop commenting on this question, as I don't have an SBS server any more, and I can't really answer the question more completely without seeing the interface again.  If the client has already picked another application server, then co_ol may have no choice but to work with this decision.  There are many other messaging platforms out there, and many reasons not to run Exchange, along with many reasons to run application X specifically.

Francois
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franked_itCommented:
co_ol,
If you need reasons for sticking with Exchange over David.zehn, then I'd be happy to help provide some strong reasons, and help point you in the direction to start comparing the two platforms.  There are compelling arguments the other direction as well, including the multimedia and built-in unification of messaging.  I don't think this is your question, and I certainly didn't intend for this discussion to go this way.  Feel free to either post a new question if you need more along this lines, and I'm sorry I don't have an SBS server in front of me to help you through removing the Exchange component.
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co_olAuthor Commented:
Well I guess thats why I have asked the question in this forum. He has been running SBS for a while and it's running fine. He is a travel wholesaler and the David.zehn software has apparently a higher integration with the booking software than exchange has.  That's all I know,  I will go ahead and trai the software on my test server anyway. Thanks all for your advise. I will report back on this
I still would like get an opinion on my original question. If I wanted to disable exchange which would be the best way to go. Disabling services???????
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Michael WorshamInfrastructure / Solutions ArchitectCommented:
One other option your client might want to take is using the SBS Transition Pack, to move away from the SBS platform and onto Windows Server 2003 environment, since that David.Zehn application actually runs under the Windows Server 2003 platform as well.

http://www.microsoft.com/WindowsServer2003/sbs/techinfo/planning/transition.mspx
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
The best way in my opinion is to remove the SBS system entirely and put in a new, non-SBS Server.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
co_ol,

You seem to be working from an assumption based on something that you haven't even investigated.  Since you've now been told that disabling Exchange on an SBS is the wrong way to go, you probably need to go back and investigate what integration is supposedly better with this other program.  Then, you can come back here and ask if Exchange can do the same thing... and if it can't, then you should look at replacing his base infrastructure.

But you're putting the cart before the horse.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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