sine/sound wave patterns of music instruments - is there any one that gives a regular sine wave?

Hi,

I would like to know if there is any musical instrument that gives a regular sine wave pattern as it's sound wave.

Violins for instance give saw-teeth like patterns, clarinets give square wave functions.
LVL 4
macuser777Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

ridCommented:
Possibly a flute or an organ can produce near-sine output on some notes, but I'd be really surprised if you'd find an instrument that does that consistently.
/RID
0
macuser777Author Commented:
can you tell me why the flute or organ might do it?
0
Arthur_WoodCommented:
I doubt that any musical instrument will produce a PURE sine wave.  The will all produce harmonics, which is part of the richness of the tone created by the instrument.  The notes created by a musical instrument are a complex mixture of the fundamental (the pure sine wave at a specific frequency), and the harmonics   of the frequency, created by the complex internal structure of the instrument itself.

No instrument will ever create a single, pure sine wave - nor would any musician want it to - a pure note, without the attendant harmonic overtones, would not be musically useful.

AW
0
Cloud Class® Course: Microsoft Exchange Server

The MCTS: Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 certification validates your skills in supporting the maintenance and administration of the Exchange servers in an enterprise environment. Learn everything you need to know with this course.

ridCommented:
The voice of a flute (organs are arrayed flutes, basically) depends on a resonance phenomenon that is generated by the very minute alterations to the air flow that occur when air is forced to split against an edge. The tone is not depending on a reed or a string or any physically moving object; that makes for a "purer" note. As said, no instrument will produce a truly pure sine wave, however.

A mike and an oscilloscope will tell the tale...
/RID
0
ozoCommented:
maybe a tuning fork would be close, but if you had a perfect sine wave, the note could never stop
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
ozoCommented:
a glass harmonica can also come close
0
macuser777Author Commented:
Thank you, Experts, for your time answering this question. I really appreciate it.

If you can look at this related q if you have time it would be a great help.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/index.jsp?qid=23115339

Regards,

macuser
0
macuser777Author Commented:
Thank you all very much. I enjoyed pondering your answers. I hope the point split was ok.

If you have time please look at this related q.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/index.jsp?qid=23115339

Regards,

macuser
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Math / Science

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.