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sine/sound wave patterns of music instruments - is there any one that gives a regular sine wave?

Hi,

I would like to know if there is any musical instrument that gives a regular sine wave pattern as it's sound wave.

Violins for instance give saw-teeth like patterns, clarinets give square wave functions.
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macuser777
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macuser777
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4 Solutions
 
ridCommented:
Possibly a flute or an organ can produce near-sine output on some notes, but I'd be really surprised if you'd find an instrument that does that consistently.
/RID
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macuser777Author Commented:
can you tell me why the flute or organ might do it?
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Arthur_WoodCommented:
I doubt that any musical instrument will produce a PURE sine wave.  The will all produce harmonics, which is part of the richness of the tone created by the instrument.  The notes created by a musical instrument are a complex mixture of the fundamental (the pure sine wave at a specific frequency), and the harmonics   of the frequency, created by the complex internal structure of the instrument itself.

No instrument will ever create a single, pure sine wave - nor would any musician want it to - a pure note, without the attendant harmonic overtones, would not be musically useful.

AW
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ridCommented:
The voice of a flute (organs are arrayed flutes, basically) depends on a resonance phenomenon that is generated by the very minute alterations to the air flow that occur when air is forced to split against an edge. The tone is not depending on a reed or a string or any physically moving object; that makes for a "purer" note. As said, no instrument will produce a truly pure sine wave, however.

A mike and an oscilloscope will tell the tale...
/RID
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ozoCommented:
maybe a tuning fork would be close, but if you had a perfect sine wave, the note could never stop
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ozoCommented:
a glass harmonica can also come close
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macuser777Author Commented:
Thank you, Experts, for your time answering this question. I really appreciate it.

If you can look at this related q if you have time it would be a great help.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/index.jsp?qid=23115339

Regards,

macuser
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macuser777Author Commented:
Thank you all very much. I enjoyed pondering your answers. I hope the point split was ok.

If you have time please look at this related q.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/index.jsp?qid=23115339

Regards,

macuser
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