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Passing & Returning Objects to Functions

Posted on 2008-01-29
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I have been giving a function by my instructor to be used to test if my code can handle a constant:

 Distance fun (const Distance &x) {
      Distance y, z;
      cout << "fun:  passed value: ";
      x.Paint ('M');
      y = z = x;
      y.SetDistance (1234.);
      cout << "fun:  alterd value: ";
      y.Paint ('M');
      return z;
}

Also given by the instructor, is the test passing and return objects to functions:
      a = fun (c);
      cout << "a should now be the same as c: \n";
      a.Paint ('M');
      c.Paint ('M');

I continue to get a single error message: 'fun': identifier not found

Here is my header:
class Distance {
/*==================================*/
/* class data
/*==================================*/
protected:
      double totalmm; //total distance in millimeters
/*==================================*/
/* class function
/*==================================*/
public:
      //constructors
      Distance ();  
      Distance (long millimeter);
      Distance (long meter, long centimeter, long millimeter);
      Distance (int feet, int inches);
      Distance (double miles);

      //Access Functions
      double GetDistance () const;  // distance storing converted to mm
      void SetDistance (double mm); // set the stored distance accordingly

      //Conversion functions
      double MtoE () const;
      double EtoM (int feet, int inches) const;  // one to pass 2 ints, & one to pass a double
      double EtoM (double miles) const;
      
      //Determine how to print the distance
      void Paint (char unit) const; // single char

      //Fun Fuction
      Distance fun (const Distance &x);

};
My implementation file:
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

#include "Distance.h"

/*==============================================*/
/* Distance:  default constructor, no parameters
/*      use 0 as the distance??
/*==============================================*/
Distance::Distance() {
      totalmm = 0; //using 0 as distance
}

//==============================================//
//GetDistance:  returns a double which is the
//  distance I am storing converted to mm
//==============================================//
double Distance::GetDistance () const {
      return totalmm;
}
//==============================================//
//SetDistance:  accepts a double mm - set stored
//   distance accordingly
//==============================================//
void Distance::SetDistance(double mm) {
      totalmm = mm;
}

/*==================================*/
/* Distance:  constructors
/*==================================*/
//Accept long number of millimeters
Distance::Distance (long mm) { }

//Accept trio of longs - meters, centimeters, & millimeters
Distance::Distance (long m, long cm, long mm) {
}

//Accept 2 ints - feet & inches
Distance::Distance (int ft, int in) {
      totalmm = EtoM(ft,in);
}

//Accept double miles
Distance::Distance (double mi) { }

//==============================================//
//Metric to English (MtoE): returns double representing
// the feet that this distance represents
//=============================================//
double Distance::MtoE () const {
       double result;
     result = (totalmm * MTF) / 1000;
       return result;
}

//=============================================//
//English to Metric (EtoM):  two ints (feet and inches),
// and returns the double millimeters
//============================================//
double Distance::EtoM (int feet, int inches) const {
// **need to ask about this - Set Distance is for double values
      double result;

      // (feet * 12 + inches) / (12 * 25.4)
      result = (feet * I + inches) ;// I * ITM;
      return result;
}

//============================================//
//English to Metric (EtoM): double miles and returns
// the double millimeters
//============================================//
double Distance::EtoM (double miles) const {
      
      double result;
      // miles * 160934
      result = totalmm * MTM;
      return result;
}


//============================================//
//Paint: char which is sed to determine how to print
// distance
//===========================================//
void Distance::Paint (char unit) const {

      if (toupper (unit) == 'M')
            cout << "Distance is = " << totalmm << " millimeters \n";
      if (toupper (unit) == 'F')
            cout << "Distance is = " << totalmm  << " feet \n";
      if (toupper (unit) == 'I')
            cout << "Distance is = " << totalmm  << " meters and millimeters \n";
      if (toupper (unit) == 'L')
            cout << "Distance is = " << totalmm << " miles \n";
}

//============================================//
//Fun:
//
//===========================================//

 Distance fun (const Distance &x) {
      Distance y, z;
      cout << "fun:  passed value: ";
      x.Paint ('M');
      y = z = x;
      y.SetDistance (1234.);
      cout << "fun:  alterd value: ";
      y.Paint ('M');
      return z;
}

And finally my test program... towards the bottom is where the compiler is pointing to my error.
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

#include "Distance.h"

using namespace std;

int main () {

//==========================================//
// Create a main program to test the Distance class//
//==========================================//
   cout << "Testing Distance Class";

      Distance a;
      Distance b (1000.);
      Distance c (100L, 50L, 8L);
      Distance d (10 , 11);
      Distance f (1.23);

      a.SetDistance (1234.);
      cout << "Testing GetDistance for object a - 1234 mm = "
                << a.GetDistance () << " mm\n\n";
      cout << "Testing MtoE member function 1234 mm equals " 
                << a.MtoE () << " feet\n\n";

//And you still aren't storing any data (*hint*)
//storing the variables passed in in their converted form...
   int feet = 10;
   int inches = 11;
      d.EtoM (10, 11);
      cout << "Testing EtoM member function 10 feet, 11 inches equals "
            << d.EtoM (feet, inches) << " millimeters\n\n";

      double miles = 0;
       f.SetDistance (1.23);
      cout << "Testing EtoM member function 1.23 miles equals "
               << f.EtoM (miles) << " millimeters\n\n";

cout << " _______________________________________\n\n";
//========================================//
//Now use these 5 objects and test the Paint function ???
//========================================//

b.SetDistance (1000.);
d.Paint  ('M');  //  = 131 millimeters
b.Paint ('f') ;  //  = 1000 feet
f.Paint ('l');  // = 1.23 miles
cout << endl << endl;


      
cout << " _______________________________________\n\n";
//========================================//
//Next test assignment                                      //
//========================================//

      a = b;
      cout << "a should now be the same as b: \n";
      a.Paint ('M');
      b.Paint ('M');

cout << " _______________________________________\n\n";

//========================================//
//Test passing & returning objects to functions //
//========================================//

                      a = fun (c);         ------------------------------------------------> identifier not found

      cout << "a should now be the same as c: \n";
      a.Paint ('M');
      c.Paint ('M');



return 0;
}
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Question by:gndcdosps
8 Comments
 
LVL 53

Accepted Solution

by:
Infinity08 earned 2000 total points
ID: 20772884
Put the fun function in the same file as the main (above the main).
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:evilrix
ID: 20772887
You have fun declared as a member function of Distance but you've defined it as a free standing function. Try changing it to like below.
Distance Distance::fun (const Distance &x) {
      Distance y, z;
      cout << "fun:  passed value: ";
      x.Paint ('M');
      y = z = x;
      y.SetDistance (1234.);
      cout << "fun:  alterd value: ";
      y.Paint ('M');
      return z;
}

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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 20772899
and it should NOT be a member function of Distance, as it is a test function - ie. a function with the sole purpose to test the Distance class.
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:evilrix
ID: 20772920
>> and it should NOT be a member function of Distance, as it is a test function - ie. a function with the sole purpose to test the Distance class.
Well, it could be a self test function. It will need to be declared static though if that's how you want to use it.

class Distance {
public:
...
   static Distance fun (const Distance &x);
...
};
class Distance {
public:
...
   static Distance fun (const Distance &x); // test function
...
};
 
Distance::fun(x);

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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 20772950
>> Well, it could be a self test function.

I don't think that was intended ;)

Note that the teacher said to call the function like this :

      a = fun (c);


Just move the fun function to the same file as the main (above the main), and remove these lines from the Distance class :

      //Fun Fuction
      Distance fun (const Distance &x);
0
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 20772983
As 'fun()'' is also declared as a class member, there's another issue - wherever you put it, you need to remove the declaration of fun

      //Fun Fuction
      Distance fun (const Distance &x);

from inside 'Distance' - make that


#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
 
#include "Distance.h"
 
// Fun Function
Distance fun (const Distance &x); // <----
 
using namespace std;
 
int main () {
 //...
}

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Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 20772995
I think that was pretty much what I said, jkr ;)
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Author Closing Comment

by:gndcdosps
ID: 31426207
Thanks Infinity08!!
And thanks to the rest, but Infinity's answer is the answer I was looking for....
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