trying diskpart to extend boot partition. having trouble accessing hard drives using ntfs bootdisk

I want to extend the space on my C drive (boot partition) from 12G to 60G (the rest of the space on the disk).  I have a dell poweredge 2800 server with windows 2003 server running. I do not want to reinstall the OS.  I read how to do it using diskpart.exe from the command line, but the trick is I can't do it while the OS is booted.  So, I tried to use an NTFS bootdisk (Windows setup CD) but it does not recongize my SCSI hard drives during the setup phase and I do not have a floppy drive on the system to provide the drivers it needs.  So my question is: 1) How can I provide SCSI drivers during Windows setup phase using a USB drive or CD Drive? or 2) how can I extend my boot partition without using diskpart.exe?
educateur370Asked:
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PeteJThomasCommented:
Here is an excerpt from an answer to a similar question -

If you do not have an FDD to install the drivers, download and install nLiteOS and also download your SATA drivers.

nLiteOS
http://www.nliteos.com/download.html

You can create a new XP install (repair) disk with your SATA drivers slipstreamed on it. That way you do not need to press F6, and if you don't HAVE a floppy drive, this may be your only option.

A good article on slipstreaming using nLiteOS
http://www.maximumpc.com/article/How-To--Slipstream-your-XP-installation

Hope that helps!
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PeteJThomasCommented:
Obviously in your case you just need to download the SCSI drivers instead of the SATA ones (I know that's obvious but still felt the need to clarify)...
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Pétur Ingi EgilssonSoftware Engineer -- ConsultantCommented:
Text from http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/how-do-i-resize-windows-partition-with-open-source-software.html

RESIZE PARTITION with Knoppix Live CD

Step #1 : Visit official Knoppix site and download live CD.

Step #2 : Burn Knoppix Live CD to DVD/CD media

Step #3 : Boot from CD

Step #4 : Boot into Knoppix > Open terminal > type command qtparted >

Step #5: Follow on screen instructions to resize your windows partition
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3cc3ntricCommented:
A quicker way, without the reinstall etc is to run a partition software like acornis or you could use DriveImage XML which is free

http://www.runtime.org/dixml.htm

All the best
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3cc3ntricCommented:
Apols Peter

Unintentional Over-posting!
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Pétur Ingi EgilssonSoftware Engineer -- ConsultantCommented:
np 3cc3ntric
Next time... give linux a chance :)
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
(1)  Download the free demo of Boot-It NG [http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-next-generation.htm ] and create a bootable CD or floppy (if you have a floppy drive).

(2)  Boot to the Boot-It CD/floppy;  click on CANCEL at the first prompt;  then on OK to go to Maintenance Mode.

(3)  Click on Partition Work.

... If the Partition Work screen shows your SCSI drive okay (it will as long as it's enumerated through the BIOS) then what you want to do is simple.   If not, then Boot-It won't work for this (so just skip the rest of my comments).

Assuming you can see the drive and its partition structure okay, then it's very simple to do what you need.   What you need to do depends on the current structure of your drive.   You indicated you wanted to add "... the rest of the space on the disk ...".

=>  If the disk currently only has one partition (your C: drive); then all you have to do is highlight the current partition; click on ReSize;  select the new size (the max); and let it finish (it will just take a few seconds).   Done :-)

=>  If the disk contains another partition (or partitions) and the free space is at the end of the disk; you'll first have to "Slide" the other partitions to the end of the disk so the free space is next to C:.   Then you can ReSize C: as I just noted.   The "Slide" operations can take a fairly long time (depending on how much data is in the partitions).   Let me know if this is the case and I'll give you more specific details on how to do this.


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educateur370Author Commented:
I tried using the knoppix software which looked like it did the trick at first glance:  it resized the partition.  However, windows explorer doesn't recognize the increase in size.  Under windows computer management console using the disk management snap-in it shows contradicting sizes.  In the bottom window it shows the partition as being 60G in size, but in the top window it shows the partition as still being 12G in size.  Either the software feel short or I missed a step.  Any suggestions?

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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
Boot with Boot-It and post exactly what the Partition Work screen currently shows.   Not sure what qtparted did to your partitions, but as long as they're structurally okay Boot-It can probably fix it.

What WAS the partition structure of the disk before you tried this?   ... was the C: partition the only partition on the disk?
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educateur370Author Commented:
The C: partition was 12G in size.  I also had a D:  patition that was 58G in size, that I deleted before attempting to resize the C: partition. I'll get back to you regarding what the partition work screen shows.  I have to take the server off-line, which as you could guess requires giving notification to everyone.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
Since you deleted D: the ReSize operation should be trivial (No ReSizing & Sliding of D: needed) ==> and should just take a matter of seconds.   But it's not clear what your abortive attempt with qtparted did ... it may have created another partition (which you can just delete if that's the case).

If there's free space after the first (C:) partition, just click on ReSize and let Boot-It do the resize while the system's down => Boot-It is an exceptionally reliable tool ... it won't proceed if it finds any structural errors on the partition.   (I never use anything else these days)

If you're not sure about the current partition structure, post it here and I'll tell you what I think ... although clearly this will require two sets of down time.

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educateur370Author Commented:
It doesn't appear as though qtparted resized the partition correctly. After using atparted I had conflicting results.  Windows2003 server showed the c: drive as being 62G using the diskmanagement snap-in, but everywhere else (i.e. explorer) it still showed it as 12G.  

When I used boot-it the C: partition showed up as being 62G in size right off the bat.  I selected save and rebotted and presto my OS recongized the resize everywhere!  It was very simple...the way it ought to be!  I've just added "boot-it" to my MUST HAVE utilities list.  Thanks garycase and everyone else for your hlep.  
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
You're most welcome ... and I definitely agree that Boot-It is a "must have" utility :-)
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