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Upgrading Main domain controller/FSMO holder

Hi Experts
I normally deal with SBS so hoping someone can shed some light on this.
Background: We have a Windows 2000 Server which holds all FSMO roles and a seperate Exchange 2003 server on the domain. There are one or two other Windows 2000 servers that perform menial tasks like file sharing.

I would like to 'upgrade' the Windows 2000 DC to a completely new server running Windows 2003. The plan is to simply join it to the domain, promote it and demote the other unit but I'm unsure how this will affect the licensing?

Thanks!
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MarkMichael
Asked:
MarkMichael
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1 Solution
 
reubstrCommented:
This sounds too easy, but have done it a few times.

1. Bring it on line (2k3) and then dcpromo it from a command prompt to make it a DC.
2. At that point, go into Sites and Services and Make it a Global Catalog Server. (NTDS Settings for that server)
3. Make it the master of all the FSMO roles.
From the new DC
 - Active Directory, (at the root... "Active directory..." right click) properties, RID, PDC, Infra Masters, click change on all three making it the new master.
 - Sites and Services, Operations Master (at the root... "Active directory..." right click) properties, Change.
 - Schema, same song... change... (must be schema admin and enterprise admin for this, maybe the others too. I am so I am do not remember)
  - You may want to check all your DHCP etc... if it is running on this box.
 - back up all your data if any is there
4. DCPROMO the old box to make it a member server.
5. Remove it from the domain.
6. Rebuild - add to the domain - DCPROMO move the roles back.

Reubstr
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reubstrCommented:
Step 2 is right click on NTDS Settings...

You won't see operations master until you click properties.. sorry for the confusion.
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MarkMichaelAuthor Commented:
Hi
thanks for that but I was wondering more about the licensing implications of taking the old 2000 FSMO holder out?
e.g. Will the new server need specific user CALs or can it use whatever was in place for the domain beforehand?
Do we need a 'server' type CAL?
Not very familiar with the CAL thingies!

Thanks
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reubstrCommented:
The cals are different for 2003 than for 2000. You will have to order more cals.

Based on your infrastructure, you can't need to many cals. Especially if you do it by connections rather than seats. How many users? You can buy a copy of 03 with enough cals, or buy more.
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MarkMichaelAuthor Commented:
I believe there's around 90 users... so that means 90 cals? Just to upgrade a domain controller from 2000 -> 2003? ;/
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reubstrCommented:
Unfortunatly yes. Use a per client scenario if you have multiple servers. It is either one CAL, on each 2003 server for every User/Device, or One CAL on each user/device to access the server. The below article has a good visual.

Taking the FSMO roles has nothing to do with it though. If you have a 2003 box, you need CAL's for it. It doesn't have to be a DC.

MS: "Authenticated access is defined as an exchange of user or application credentials between the server software and a user or device"

This server software, will be exchanging credentials. You have to buy the CAL's.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/howtobuy/licensing/caloverview.mspx 
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MarkMichaelAuthor Commented:
It looks like 50 Exchange CALs AND 50 2003 user CALs were purchased at the same time as the Exchange server went in; is there still a need to acquire an additional 50 2003 CALs?
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MarkMichaelAuthor Commented:
...and the Exchange box is a domain controller.
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reubstrCommented:
The best way to do it, is per user/ per device as in the article. That way, a user can have a single 2003 CAL, and a single Exchange CAL, and can access all 2003 servers.

Yes, you will need 50 of each.

When you buy Exchange, and the CAL's, it does give every user with a CAL legal rights to run OUTLOOK 2003. It is part of the package.
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reubstrCommented:
so if you 100 CAL's for Exchange 2003, you will have rights to use 100 copies of Outlook 2003.
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