How do I put the smtp connector on the front end exchange server 2003 that is in the DMZ?

I have one win2k3 server in the DMZ which is our webserver. I'm planning to install also in that same server exchange 2003 which will act as a front end server.

I also have one win2k3 server behind the firewall in which the exchange 2003 will be installed as a backend server.

I only have one public IP for the web and I'm planning to use NAT so that I can also use that public IP for the email. The exchange 2003 will only be used in OWA in https for web access and in outlook for office access.

Is the scenario above possible? To install only smtp connector in the front end server and the mailboxes of the user in the backend server? Could someone give me a link or step by step on how to do this?
keira321Asked:
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hstilesCommented:
I would strongly advise against making your web server a front-end exchange. You have to open loads of ports

Front-End Exchange => Domain Controllers
 
DNS
Kerberos-Adm (UDP)
Kerberos-Sec (TCP)
Kerberos-Sec (UDP)
LDAP
LDAP (UDP)
LDAP GC (Global Catalog)
Microsoft CIFS (TCP)
Microsoft CIFS (UDP)
NTP
Ping
RPC (all interfaces)
 
Front-End Exchange servers => Back-End Exchange servers
 
HTTP
IMAP4
POP3
SMTP
Exchange Link State Routing (TCP691)
RPC over HTTP Information Store
(TCP6001)
RPC over HTTP DSReferral (TCP6002)
RPC over HTTP DSProxy (TCP6004)
 
Back-End Exchange servers => Front-End Exchange servers
 
Exchange ActiveSync Direct Push
(UDP2883)

So I would argue that any security benefits are outweighed by the holes in your firewall required for front end back end operation to work through a firewall.

If you do not need HTTPS on your website, then simply simply up a redirect on your web server to redirect users to the Exchange server.  If both are listening on different pors - so only https i used for OWA this will be very straightforward.

SMTP is much easier.  Simply install the SMTP connector on your web server .  On the SMTP connector on your Exchange, specify the IP port,better, the hostname of the web server as smarthost.

Configuring the SMTP service to enable your web server to act as a mail relay is simple.You need to specify the names of all of the domains handled by exchange as default local domain and remote domains and instruct the SMTP service to deliverall fo these to your Exchange server.

You can then modify your firewall config so that port 80 traffic goes to your web server, port 35 traffic goes to theSMTP connector installedon your web server and 443 goes to your Exchange Server.
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keira321Author Commented:
Sorry need more clarification on what you wrote above, what do you suggest? Remove the front end exchange 2003 and maintain the backend server? How can I install the smtp connector without exchange in the web server?

All I need to do is when I'm outside I can access my mail via OWA using HTTPS and when I'm in the office I'll access it using outlook.
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