Definition of a "Major Network"

As the title suggests, what is the definition of a "Major Network"?

The first guess would be that it is a network of the nearest classful boundry.  Like 10.0.0.0/8 or 172.16.0.0/16 versus 10.1.0.0/9 or 172.16.1.0/23.  But I am not entirely sure.

thanks
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Eric-arupAsked:
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
I think that's subjective. I don't know that there's an official definition of "Major Network". Maybe if we had the context it was used in.
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naughtonCommented:
I agree with don johnston, a major network is not about the subnet you use, but m,ore about the network, its complexity etc.  there are no defined goal posts to cross to becoem a "major network'.

even more so, ISP's use routers on single PC networks with subnets of 10.10.10.x/24 or 10.0.0.x/24

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Brian UtterbackPrinciple Software EngineerCommented:
I think that the term is a little too general to have a specific definition out of context. If you want a more meaningful
answer, I think you are going to have to give us some details about the context and why you are asking.
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Eric-arupAuthor Commented:
I was reading a cisco network academy question where it was dealing with eigrp and auto-sumarization.  There was a simulation that has a bunch of loopbacks on 3 routers, all the networks were with classless subnets like /29 and /30 and some /23

They listed a large table of all the IP's involved and all their subnets and asked a question like how many "major networks" are involved in this sim.  Unfortunatly i dont have the exact question with me anymore.
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Brian UtterbackPrinciple Software EngineerCommented:
Okay, you original supposition is correct. Cisco refers to classful networks are major networks in their IGRP documentation. So, a major network is any
network that is not a subnet of any other network.  That is, one that has a subnet mask that is divisible by 8 and matches its class.
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Eric-arupAuthor Commented:
are there any special considerations there for the rfc1918 address of 172.16.0.0/12, could it be called a major network?  Or would i just consider it to be several major /16 networks?

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Brian UtterbackPrinciple Software EngineerCommented:
No, 172.16.0.0/12 is not one major network. It would be considered 16 different class B major networks.
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Eric-arupAuthor Commented:
perfect, thank you
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