Drawing horizontal / vertical and polylines

We have upgraded to Office 2007 and I am finding it difficult to draw lines which only have horizontal and vertical segments. In Office 97 you could press (I think CTRL) key and the line would be locked to vertical or horizontal lines only.

I am also having problems drawing poly lines (free form) lines which contains a few segments which are only horizontal and vertical.

Attached file indicates what I want to do.
Question.jpg
CharlesSHillAsked:
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csoussanCommented:
Try holding down the Shift key while drawing the lines.
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CharlesSHillAuthor Commented:
No, that does not work.

Way to test: Draw a line which is not quite vertical (1/2 page). Now try to make it vertical even by pressing Shift. In the older Office (97) if you press the Shift, the line was locked either horizontal or vertical. This does not seem to be the case in Office 2007
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csoussanCommented:
I've done some more research and here is what I found on the Microsoft site.  Microsoft considers it a feature enhancement that you now can constrain the line at 15-degree angles from its starting point, when you press and hold SHIFT as you drag (as opposed to only being able to constrain the line at 90-degree angles - which is what you want to be able to do).  This means that there is 24 possible angles instead of the 4 that you want.

So, to answer your question...

If you want to draw a vertical line, you need to hold down the shift key as you drag and let go when you're at the 90-degree mark (6 line movements up).  If you want to draw a horizontal line, you need to hold down the shift key as you drag and do not move the line up or down.  The good news is, it is easy to size the line movement and constrain it to the angle you desire.  

I know it's not the answer you wanted to hear but, i hope it helps.
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GlennaShawCommented:
Hey Croussan,
Where did you find this info on the Microsoft site?  We've (the PowerPoint MVPS) been all over Microsoft about this issue and no one has given us this explaination.
BTW, another bug is the jump to center when zoomed in.  Basically if you're zoomed in and editing points on a shape or line it will jump to the center of the object after editing each point.  Very annoying.
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csoussanCommented:
Hi CharlesSHill & GlennaShaw:

I tried to find the exact web page I found before but, no luck.  However, I did find the following page:

Draw or delete a line, connector, or freeform shape: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/powerpoint/HA101326581033.aspx#PPT

In the course of looking over the page, I realized that the 15-degree constrain was for Word 2007.  PowerPoint 2007 constrains it to 45 degrees.  So, the answer should be corrected to read as follows:

To constrain the line at 45-degree angles from its starting point, press and hold SHIFT as you drag.  This means that to draw a vertical line, you need to hold down the shift key as you drag and let go when you're at the 90-degree mark (2 line movements up).  If you want to draw a horizontal line, you need to hold down the shift key as you drag and do not move the line up or down.  This should make it fairly easy to draw a 90-degree angle.
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