I need an Example Database (.mdb file) where all the data tables are linked on Integer Fields.

My MS Access 2003 application works fine using data tables linked on the string fields that are also displayed in Text, List, Combo boxes, etc.  I "normalized" the back end data files and now all the tables are linked using Integers Primary Keys (autonumber) and Foreign Keys (Long Integer).  Now if I get the form to work when scrolling through the recordset, I cannot get the correct data in my Combo Boxes to Add Records or change existing data.  Are there any example databases out there to learn from?
bobbatAsked:
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RyanProject Engineer, ElectricalCommented:
Northwinds is the popular example database. I'm sure you can find it to download online.
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database Architect / Systems AnalystCommented:
"using Integers Primary Keys (autonumber) "

Actually, an Autonumber data type is Long Integer, not Integer ... just an FYI.

mx
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
bobbat,

<I cannot get the correct data in my Combo Boxes to Add Records or change existing data>
From what I can tell your comboboxes were originally looking at the text value,

Now they must be changed to look at the Long Integer value, but "display" the text.

For example:
You were displaying the Customer's Name in the combo box.
Now you need to Display the Customer Name but reference the CustomerID.

Again, as MrBullwinkle, suggested Northwind is a great resource.

JeffCoachman
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bobbatAuthor Commented:
One area of confusion is what number does the first column of a query start with.  It seems like sometimes it is 0 and sometimes it's one.  Can anyone clarify?
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
bobbat,

<first column of a query start with>
AFAIK, for a combobox, the first column is referenced as 0
(Me.cboCountry.Column(0))

When is it ever a 1?

JeffCoachman
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database Architect / Systems AnalystCommented:
On the property sheet of a combo, columns are numbered 1,2,3 .... N

In code or expressions, *physical* column 1 is referenced as zero (0), 2 = 1, 3=2 etc.  Ie, referencing is zero based.  But note ... this was not MY idea, lol.

So ... Me.YourCombo  is the same as Me.YourCombo(0)   and is the default reference ( you don't need the (0) for physical Column 1.

Me.YourCombo(1) is referencing physical Column 2 .... and so on.

I know it's confusing, but that's how it is ...

mx
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
DatabaseMX

Me:
<When is it ever a 1?>
You:
<On the property sheet of a combo, columns are numbered 1,2,3 .... N>

You know, I never really paid it much attention.
The Bound Column property is usually set to 1, which is really column Zero (0)

;)

JeffCoachman
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