802.11n modem and router for comcast cable internet

I'd like to upgrade my modem and router to the newer 802.11n spec, even though that spec may not be finalized. I'm currently using the Motorola SBG900 which has the modem and the router built in. Comcast told me they support 11n but asked me for the newer hardware II want to buy. I'm not there yet so thought I'd ask for help here.

I have a large house with lots of rooms I'd like to cover. I mey need a repeater or access point at some later time to further help the signal. But right now, this is just the hardware question.  I run an XP and Vista wireless home network.

For now I'd like to replace the SBG900 (802.11g) with 11n. Suggestions please. Should I buy just the modem then purchase a router with it and if so, what brands and models and how best to connect them? I've tried lots of links so prefer something discussed here by someone who has done it, preferably using Comcast broadband and 802.11n.
JanrowAsked:
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meverestCommented:
802.11n is just another wireless protocol and has no bearing on the router or modem operation.  You will do well enough to keep your existing modem/router and connect any 802.11n access point.

If you set up the wireless network as a plain bridge, then the router will do all the networking work, and the wireless AP will implement the LAN - which is how it should be.

Cheers.
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JanrowAuthor Commented:
Are you saying there's absolutely no advantage of buying a modem/router that supports 802.11n?
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meverestCommented:
other than the 'convenience in one package' factor - no.

cheers.


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JanrowAuthor Commented:
I'm not understanding your one-line, brief explanation. So I can close this question, would you, or someone else, please be more specific and verbose with your answer and even more important, why you gave the answer you did. I can't see that I've learned anything.
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JanrowAuthor Commented:
Specifically, I also don't understand your wording on the following:

> as a plain bridge
> the router will do all the networking work
> wireless AP
> implement the LAN

Remember, you're a Genius level. I'm a beginner. Pretend that you're talking to Hillary Clinton's secretary's assistant. Otherwise this might take a long time, back and forth.
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meverestCommented:
Hi Janrow,

sorry if my comments appear like greek to you (or french, in case you are greek! ;-)

'a plain bridge' is a network component that 'bridges' two independent networks together so that they operate like one physical network.  For example, a bridge may connect a wireless LAn and a wired LAN together so that to any device connected to the wired network appears to also exist on the wireless network and vice versa.

Thus a wireless device that is connected to an access point (AP) device set up in bridge mode will appear to be plugged directly to the modem by ethernet as far as all other devices are concerned.

Assume that there is no wireless network at all.  You would connect a computer to the router using an ethernet cable.  The router assigns an IP address to the computer over the ethernet cable, and then delivers internet over that cable. Now unplug the cable from the computer and plug into a wireless AP instead.  Connect the computer to the AP by wireless, and you end up with technically exactly the same thing as before:  the wirless device literally replaces that length of cable between the router/modem and the computer.

it is very common for a modem to also include a built in router, and often includes multiple ethernet ports (network sockets) - it is less common to also include wireless features.  If you already have a modem and router, then why replace them when all you want to do is to try a different wireless technology?

Incidentally, if you just want to increase wireless range, have you considered using WDS?  (WDS is a kind of wireless 'repeater' method and supported by most 802.11a/b/g devices generally available.

Cheers.
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JanrowAuthor Commented:
Okay, looks like I have more to learn than I thought. Thanks for taking the time to explain. It really does help.
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