Faulty motherboard capacitor

I have a PC that will randomly lock up and then the screen will change to blurred colours about 10 seconds later.  These lockups usually occur when loading startup programs but only randomly.

Upon inspection of the motherboard there is 1 capacitor that is bulged and leaking, my question is can 1 leaking capacitor cause such a problem(no other capacitors are bulged).  I know it could be GPU, RAM, HDD etc.
LVL 1
BellscapeAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Peter HartCommented:
yep - I would say so.
random shutdowns, bizarre behaviour etc...
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Peter HartCommented:
0
Viper596Commented:
yes, it can definately cause a problem. If you don;t put it off, you may be able to save your board. If you are good with a soldering iron, you can purchase a capacitor at your local electronics store, or over the internet, and replace it in no time.
0
MSSPs - Are you paying too much?

WEBINAR: Managed security service providers often deploy & manage products from a variety of solution vendors. But is this really the best approach when it comes to saving time AND money? Join us on Aug. 15th to learn how you can improve your total cost of ownership today!

Peter HartCommented:
careful about the soldering - most  mother boards are multilayered one drop of hot solder
0
PUNKYCommented:
1/2 cent thought, I would not use that motherboard any longer unless have to. Replace that cap is not long term fix, you should replace the motherboard whenever you can soon. Today you found one, soon later you will see more.
0
Mal OsborneAlpha GeekCommented:
Certainly possible.  If that is the case, you may get a little more life from your PC by "Underclocking", run the CPU & frontside buss at 20% less than thier design speed.  Sometimes a slowish PC is better than none.
0
PUNKYCommented:
<<< Sometimes a slowish PC is better than none >>> :o) Of course, better than nothing huh :--}
0
BellscapeAuthor Commented:
Thanks,

I will look at replacing motherboard - I have a spare skt 478 so I will do that this arvo and see if problem persists
0
Viper596Commented:
just because you have one bad cap, doesn't mean the board is no good. The cap could have just been weak from the time it was made. I've replaced many caps in a lot of electronic devices, never had a problem yet. (not saying it can't happen) but there is a good chance your board will be fine.  
0
nobusCommented:
check this site too :   www.badcaps.net
0
f-kingIT support technicianCommented:
Hi
does this happen with another monitor?
0
PCBONEZCommented:
Hi, I re-cap motherboards, LCD monitors, and power supplies.

Low ESR capacitors on motherboards are used to 'clean up' the DC voltages used to power every chip on the motherboard. Processor, chipset, LAN chip, sound chip, drive controller chips, the memory modules, USB chips, everything.
-
Anything can be affected.
Specifically what happens depends on what that capacitor does, it's mode of failure [open circuit, short circuit, or value changes] and how it's 'wired' in relation to other capacitors.
-
Most caps are in parallel with other caps on the board or in the power supply.
If any in parallel short then all those in parallel with it are shorted too. If any change value then the value of the entire 'bank' of capacitors will be affected.
-
I've seen bad caps cause:
Slow system, dead system, random reboot, continuous reboot, BSOD, corrupted data on hard drives, drive failure, CPU damage, memory damage, burned up/melted chips, voltage regulator chips (MOSFETs) that got so hot the solder melted and the chip detached (came off) the motherboard, video card failure/damage, and near by 'good' caps to fail due to being overloaded when the first one goes. There have even been cases where caps have blown apart (explode) or caused fires on a motherboard.

The standard procedure when you find a bad cap is to replace all caps of that make on the board. The assumption is that the offending make of cap is: either a bad (cheap) cap and the rest will go soon - or it is a faulty batch of caps.

Many/most? capacitors made in Taiwan or China between about 2000 and 2003(2004??) or so are known to have issues with a faulty electrolyte that was on the market for a few years there.
(30+% of all caps in the world come from there.)
-
[ongoing problem] Capacitors made from Aluminum procured from Taiwan or China are known to fail earlier than normal and have unusually high failure rates. This is due to certain impurities in the aluminum on the market there that adversely affects the electrolyte.
** Not all manufacturers in Taiwan and China use local aluminum but most do.
-
SOME: Nichicon HM and HN series caps manufactured between 2002 and 2004 suffered from a manufacturing defect/error. (It only affected those two series of caps and only those caps produced from ONE of their factories.)
- This was the cause behind the issues with Dell GX270-SX270-GX280 systems, Apple G5, some E-machines, IBM, Gateway, HP, and Intel motherboard problems.
In fact EVERY motherboard manufacturer got caught by this one because Nichicon is one of the 'good brands' and this problem was a fluke.
-
Chemi-con KZG series seems to have problems with heat if near a CPU or a MOSFET. - Another case of a good brand and one series having a glitch.
-

Bad brand caps in power supplies are VERY COMMON these days even in high end power supplies that cost well over $100. (Which is ridiculous because the difference in cost to use good caps is less than $1.)
-
Bad caps in a PSU will cause even good brand caps on a motherboard to fail because the motherboard caps are trying to 'clean-up' more than they are designed to.
- This causes them to over heat and fail early.

.
0
PCBONEZCommented:
The point to that last little bit was:
If you have a bad cap on the motherboard (or even just bad cap like problems) you need to look INSIDE the power supply too. If there are bad caps there and you don't correct that then NOTHING else you do is going to help for long. (If at all.)
-
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Components

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.