Exchange 2007 Receive Connector questions

Exchange 2007.

From an email newbie...

I noticed two parts to the Receive Connector:
1. Use these local ip addresses to receive email
Local IP Address                     Port

2. Receive mail from remote servers that have these ip addresses:
Remote IP Address.


How do you relate these to the real world?  For example, for the Local iP addresses part, would this be used to narrow down what Internal Outlook Clients can use this Exchange Server, and on what port?  I do not see many cases where the Exchange Administrator would use anything other than 'All Available'  Please elaborate.

Also, for Remote IP Addresses....It is my understanding that any remote SMTP server should typically be allowed to send email to this Receive Connector, otherwise, the Exchange Server would not be able to receive email from the millions of SMTP servers on the Internet...or am I missing something here????
But, doesn't allowing any remote SMTP server to send email to this receive connector, make this local Exhchange Server an email relay???

Please help.
Thanks
cliffordgormleyAsked:
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MarkMichaelCommented:
Hi

I will hopefully clear this up a little for you

1. Use these local ip addresses to receive email
Local IP Address                     Port

This will be the IP that is bound to Exchange to receive emails on, nothing to do with the Outlook clients. Generally this is left blank or 'all' unless you have multiple exchange systems on one server.

2. Receive mail from remote servers that have these ip addresses:
Remote IP Address.

This will allow you to give an IP/List of IP addresses that you would like to receive email from.
Depending whether you have your ports forwarded so that your Exchange server is sitting on the Internet catching emails or not. If it is, then narrowing this down isn't a good option as you have stated above. However, if you have a 3rd party host who catches your emails first and then forwards them on to you, you can select this option to only accept connections from your Email Provider, making this a much more secure connection. If you do have a 3rd party provider, you wouldnt want to let just anyone connect to your email server, as you would be potentially receiving emails from hosts you don't want to accept.

We have a 3rd party mailhost which our MX records point to, they catch the emails and forward them on to our Exchange server. Our server will only accept emails from a set of IPs that they have given us. This can also help against SPAM as most ISP/mailhosts have spam filtering built in.

If i haven't cleared it up enough for you, let me know :)
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cliffordgormleyAuthor Commented:
MarkMichael
Hi Mark, That definitely clears things up.  Microsoft doesnt even come close to explaining it for somebody who doesnt know what they are used for.  If Msoft used more examples, it would be much better.
I will assing you points, but would like to leave this post up for a few more days to see if anybody else can provide some other real-world examples.
Thanks again,
Cliff
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cliffordgormleyAuthor Commented:
I just feel that I have an open relay with the following settings:
Receive Connector:    Permission Groups tab =Anonymous
Receive Connector:    Network ->  Remote IP Address = 0.0.0.0 - 255.255.255.255 (same as ALL networks)

Send Connector:    Address Space tab-> Specify the addresses to which this connector can route email: * (same as ALL)
Send Connector:   All other values within this object are set to default  

But without these settings, how would my Receive Connector be able to receive email from all possible  remote ip addresses/email servers,  that is destined for my internal organization?  I mean, any email server from thousands of ISPs could potentially be trying to send email to my exchange server...right???

Thanks



Thanks
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MarkMichaelCommented:
Hi

If you open up Exchange System Manager, click on 'administrative groups'

find your server.
click the + to expand
goto Protocols
goto SMTP
right click on the virtual server and select properties
You should see an Access Tab
Click Mail Relay
and you can set the restrictions in place, where people on your Local LAN are able to send via your exchange server. This will stop anyone on the Internet (only Local) sending via your Exchange server.

Also, the receive connector does indeed need to be left open to 'Receive' emails from anyone on the Internet.
Otherwise, when mail servers connect to your server, they will not be able to pass you emails.
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cliffordgormleyAuthor Commented:
thanks for all your help Mark Michael!
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MarkMichaelCommented:
Any time :)
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