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juggernaughty

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ESX 3.5 basic networking

Experts,

I have an HP ML350 G5 that I am using out of my home office as a test lab using ESX 3.0. I am fairly green with ESX technology at this point. I will be rebuilding the server using ESX 3.5 and I want to do it right this time.

My questions are pertaining to the networking setup upon initial installation:

1. What is the "local domain" option for? Is this just my internal DNS domain? If so, can I still make it a part of the domain if in fact the DNS server is a VM of the ESX host?

2. Should my ESX server be on the same VLAN as all the VMs? The server is multihomed so I could move them to another NIC.

3. Basically, is there any intro to ESX networking guide you can point me to?

Thank you in advance for your time and effort.
2.
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65td
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juggernaughty

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That ESX CBT was fantastic....great for novices such as myself.

I did have a follow up DNS question. Since my ESX server will be the only physical server in my lab is it really necessary for me to configure the name and domain? The default is localhost.localdomain and I understand what it is for, but since it will be the host of all the DNS server VMs I don't know how important it is for it to be registered in DNS for resolution.

Any further advice?
Is the host going to be on the same network as the VMs?
If so it's worth doing so if you want to ping the name to resolve IP etc. or doing any other DNS name resolution stuff.