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RAID 5 or RAID 10 (1+0) array for database & public folders

I'm setting up a completely new MS Exchange Server 2003 Standard Edition on a MS Server 2003 OS on a brand new HP Proliant ML350 server. The server has hot-swappable hard-drive bays and a 128 MB battery-backed RAID controller. I have six Western Digital SATA-II RAID Edition 2 hard drives: two of the drives are 160GB and four are 320GB. I've read much here (thanks Sembee and all) about recommended configurations. I know I'll use the two 160 GB drives in a RAID 1 array partitioned into about 30 GB for the OS and the rest for the Exchange app files and transaction logs. My questions:
1. Should I create more than two partitions on  the two 160 GB RAID 1 drives to separate the the app files from the transaction logs and perhaps from the page file?
2. For the remaining four 320 GB drives -- which will hold the database files -- should I create a RAID 5 (3 drives plus hot spare) or RAID 10 (2 x 2 drives) array?
3. Should the array of four 320 GB drives be partitioned in any way for any purpose?
Thanks in advance.
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sfschool
Asked:
sfschool
1 Solution
 
LegendZMPrincipal Security ArchitectCommented:
1: I usually create more than 2 partitions.  1 for OS , 1 for Exchange, and 1 for Paging file.

2:  For the increase performance forthe database, i'd recommend raid 10, though not as much fault taulerance, it'll be better performance. And unless 2 drives fail in the same stripe at the same time (unlikely) you can swap another in and rebuild it and be back up to running ( up to 3 drive failures across different stripes)

3: I wouldn't necessarily partition the 320 GB drives in any way, unless for your own sanity splitting up the storage/database groups.
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Ehab SalemIT ManagerCommented:
It is very important to have the transaction logs on a different array then the mdb and stm (for recovery)
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kieran_bCommented:
1.  Yes, I would go 2 partitions (at least), 100 for Operating system and 60 for Transaction Logs
2. RAID5 for the datbases
3. One big partition would be best for future work, such as defrags or whatever else - but it depends on your DB sizing, you could split it and separate databases.  Considering it is standard edition, the largest the files will be is 150 GB (for mailboxes AND public folders)
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sfschoolAuthor Commented:
Clear, concise and quick answer. Thanks.
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