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Project Server 2007 database file location on SQL Server 2005

I have installed a named instance of SQL Server 2005 for use with Project Server 2007.  Per company policy, I have installed the server instance and system databases on the smaller C: drive of the machine, where the operating system also resides.  I set the default location for new database files (.mdf and .log files) to the larger D: drive.

After this, I installed Project Server 2007 on a separate machine, and configured it to use the SQL Server 2005 named instance I described above for content databases.  I expected the content database files to be created on the D: drive, but instead it automatically plops Project content databases in the root directory, on the C: drive.  There is just not enough space to handle Project content on C:!

Is there a way to change Project Server's configuration to put database files on the D: drive?  Or, do I have to uninstall the entire instance of SQL Server, just to install it again with the root directory on the D: drive?

If I detach Project Server databases, move them, and reattach them, it might work, if I can successfully stop the Project services so they will disconnect from the databases.  However, I will have to do this manual process again and again for every new Project Server database!

What do I do?
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dmaxIT
Asked:
dmaxIT
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1 Solution
 
dmaxITAuthor Commented:
still hoping for a way to do this without uninstalling and reinstalling SQL Server and Project Server
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Greg BessoIT Solutions EngineerCommented:
Just stop the Project Server services (or if you want, shut down your Project / SharePoint server during maintenance.

On the SQL Server, disconnect your databases, move the files, reconnect them. Just so you are aware, you don't have other databases for Project Server. There is your SharePoint configuration and content databases, and the 4 project server databases.

Also, check your SQL server settings to verify you have it configured properly. Also, what service pack is on your SQL server?
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dmaxITAuthor Commented:
I think your solution would work, but it would still require the manual process to move each new database created by Project or SharePoint.  I noticed that it does appear to create a new database for each new SSP you create.  If we expand the farm at some point, we may need more???.  (I'm still new to Project and SharePoint.)  I wanted to eliminate the extra manual process, especially if someone else is doing this job one day and doesn't know.  

Before receiving your answer, I had already uninstalled and reinstalled both servers.  They were new installs, with nothing else on them, so it wasn't so bad.  I did an Advanced install, and installed only the Database Engine Feature on the D: drive.  Now all new databases are going to the D: drive.
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dmaxITAuthor Commented:
I've already uninstalled and re-installed the SQL server.  However, your solution would work, except I found that each new SSP does create a new database.  I'm not sure how many SSP's we'll end up with - there shouldn't be many, but I can't tell right now, so I decided I'd rather start over and create an environment where all of the databases will automatically go to the D: drive, without manually checking and moving each new database.
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