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Recommended FQDN (domain name) for SBS 2003

Hi - in SBS Unleashed by Neale, et al - p.49
There is a consideration of naming the domain something other than .local because using .local prevents Mac from performing name resolution.  
What experiences have you all had using the alternative suggestions in the book .office and .lan?  How about I use something like sfden.office?

Is there a minimum or maximum when considering the name of the domain?

The mac's I'll be integrating will most likely be running XPPro on parallels or bootcamp, but I want to be able to integrate them running osx too...

thanks.
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erkwong
Asked:
erkwong
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4 Solutions
 
KCTSCommented:
You can use whatever you like as a private FDQN, the only stipulation I would make is keep it short less typing for a start, and make sure youy use a two part name.
.lan
.office
.private
all work well

There is nothing to stop you using .com or .net etc if you really want, you have to tweak DNS a bit sometimes if you have external web servers using the same suffix, but its really no big deal.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I've had this debate with another person on here and we disagree.  According to everyone I've spoken with, the preferred method is to use .local or something else non-routable (the .local mac issue was for older Mac OS clients - 10.0 through 10.2 as I recall).  Still, I tend to use .lcl.

And my understanding, SBS 2008 will use .local and the only place to change this is in an answer file that you can create for use with SBS setup.
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kieran_bCommented:
For SBS, it is recommended to use .local or something like it as opposed to your real domain.

I cover the fors and against here, and was leew's "other person" -> http://www.block.net.au/content/DomainNaming.aspx
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purplepomegraniteCommented:
http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107800

10.3 and 10.4 - though the article implies that it is 10.3 and later?  Have Apple changed the default settings for later versions?  The problem is simply caused by Apple's Bonjour service treating .local addresses as it's hosts, and not querying for them in DNS.  This behaviour can be fixed, as per the article.

My thoughts on the .local - I use .local on all my networks where there is an external domain name hosted by an ISP or similar.  It just saves on DNS configuration (yes, you CAN have the same internal domain as your external, but then you have to modify your internal DNS anytime you modify external, and basically have to keep track of things in two places).  I use .com (actually it's usually .co.uk) when the internal domain has servers (in particular mail servers) accessible to the outside world - though this is only in a couple of situations for particularly large networks.
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purplepomegraniteCommented:
Oh, and for the minimum and maximum for the domain, I like to keep it as short and descriptive as I can.  A long time ago I used a particularly long internal domain name... and then discovered that it's actually surprising how often, when administering systems, you have to type the whole name out...

So, short and sweet really...
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erkwongAuthor Commented:
OK, thanks everyone for the useful information.
Trouble is - I'm even more confused now.
I think I will go with pdent.lan
Since I don't go with .local, will i need to do additional configuring?  

What real world issues will i face with this name given my SBS 2003 server, 3 XP Pro machines and 1-2 OSX 10.5 machines?  Does SBS 'like' .local more - ie. does its services look for .local by default or something?  
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purplepomegraniteCommented:
You won't face any other more issues than you would with .local.  Just because .local is generally recommended for SBS, does not mean that it is required or has special meaning.

Services, etc. are configured when AD is installed - so if you choose pdent.lan, that is the name they will look for - no issues in this regard will occur. You do exactly the same setup as if you were using .local, you just put .lan in instead!
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erkwongAuthor Commented:
Thanks for addressing that - I am simply jittery setting up my first sbs!  
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kieran_bCommented:
>>I am simply jittery setting up my first sbs!

Good, that will mean you follow the instructions to the letter.  pdent.lan will be a perfect internal domain for you, now just run through the guide to install and configure SBS and you will be away in no time.

SBS is a product that will make you look really good if you follow the installation guide :)
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