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How to determine the value of HZ / jiffy at runtime from the command line?

Posted on 2008-06-12
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Hi,

I'm writing a Perl script that reads various time values in jiffies from a Redhat Enterprise Linux installation's procfs. I need to convert these values to seconds.

The question: How do I get my kernel's HZ or jiffy value reliably from within the script? The method should be as standard as possible. The kernel version can be 2.4.* or 2.6.*. I can invoke any standard Linux tools from the script - so this really is not a perl specific question.

Thanks in advance!

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Question by:arv2008
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ravenpl earned 500 total points
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Unfortunately I don't know, but
- refer /proc/uptime /proc/stat files
- refer source code for uptime from procps package
- note that recent kernels (2.6.20+) introduced tickless kernel, which made HZ obsolete(no longer used).
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by:noci
noci earned 500 total points
ID: 21776817
IF your kernel config is available you can read it....

For kernels 2.6+ that have their config exposed in the procfs filesystem:
    zgrep CONFIG_HZ /proc/config.gz

For Redhat v2.4 kernels they were supplied as file in the /boot directory.

As it is a compile time constant (for the kernel).

And there is this example.....:)   http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-system-calls/
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