Solved

Capturing Printer Port with IP Printer in Windows 98SE

Posted on 2008-06-12
17
843 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-05
Ok guys, get the delorian out we need to go back about 8 years.

I am working with a sheet from Lotus 123 (Yuck.  Old DOS Lotus)
I need to get it working for them on a new machine temporarily while I rewrite the application in Access.
I purchased a Lexmark C532n in order to get rid of the old Lex Optra R that they were using.  Because of this, I have also elimininated an old server, which was also obsolete.  So, I'm wondering if there is a way to setup the printer to capture a printer port as LPT1 in windows 98SE so that they can print from Dos.  I was thinking net use, but can't find a command to use with an IP address.  I have also tried using the capture port option, which won't work because it is not setup as a printer share.  

I understand that if I share this printer on another maching, my previous mention would work no problem, but I'd like to completely to segment and get this thing off the network for the short time that I need it.  

Any ideas?

Thanks

Steve
0
Comment
Question by:srblaney
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • +1
17 Comments
 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
ID: 21772970
You can share the printer on the workstation it's connected to and then capture that share to LPT1 on the same machine.  Most DOS programs will not care that the shared printer is on the same machine as the  LPT port you are capturing it to, since they are not UNC_aware anyway.
0
 

Author Comment

by:srblaney
ID: 21773627
I'll try that.  Be in touch in a few mintues.
0
 

Author Comment

by:srblaney
ID: 21773714
Just tried the suggested response.  Unfortunately it didnt' work.  I am able to share the printer, but receive the following message when I try to capture the printer port:

"This operation cannot be performed to your own computer"

Any other ideas?

Thanks

Steve
0
Connect further...control easier

With the ATEN CE624, you can now enjoy a high-quality visual experience powered by HDBaseT technology and the convenience of a single Cat6 cable to transmit uncompressed video with zero latency and multi-streaming for dual-view applications where remote access is required.

 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
ID: 21773755
Can you capture it to LPT2 instead of LPT1?   It's been a long time....but maybe 98SE has a restriction to prevent you from doing a capture to a port that's being used by a physical device (i.e., LPT1 being a physical parallel port).
0
 

Author Comment

by:srblaney
ID: 21774378
I'll give that a shot, but I think I may have alredy tried that when I tried your idea.  I will let you know tomorrow.
0
 

Author Comment

by:srblaney
ID: 21774655
Tried it and still no joy.  It will not let me share any of the lpt ports.  I get the same error.
0
 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
ID: 21778958
Too bad this printer doesn't have a parallel interface - sometimes that ancient technology still comes in handy.  I think that you might be able to get an adapter cable that would convert from the USB port on the printer to the parallel port on the computer.  I googled and found this site; there are probably other options:

http://www.emtcompany.com/catagories/usb-to-parallel-adapters.htm?gclid=COXXsJrM8ZMCFQmdnAodcC5jVw

Looks like the second one down is what you would need.
0
 

Author Comment

by:srblaney
ID: 21780161
Unfortunately, I need to setup this printer on the network as it would be a pretty big hassle to run a parallel cable all that way.  Anyone have any other ideas?

Steve
0
 

Author Comment

by:srblaney
ID: 21780169
BTW. Thanks for your help Hypercat.
0
 
LVL 43

Expert Comment

by:Steve Knight
ID: 21782839
Have you thought of vmware or virtualpc?  You could install a "new" pc with an image of the old one in a VM (or a newly installed Windows 98 machine) which is dead easy to install and get working.  That can then print to the parallel port of the host machine, or to a shared printer on the host machine.  

Other than that you could attached the printer to a print server on the LAN that pretends to be a netbios machine, e.g. netgear ps121 for USB or ps101 for parallel as far as I know... then you can just net use to \\printservername\printer etc.

You could also try adding a line to LMHOSTS file resolving a name for the print server you have to it's IP address.

Steve
0
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:fhmc
ID: 21783830
I may not be following your post correctly, so please correct me if any of my assertions are incorrect.

1.  You are NOT sharing this USB printer?  You seemed to suggest that in your initial post and I have not noticed any follow up posts from you contradicting this assertion...

   if this is the case, and if sharing the printer is NOT an option, you are likely facing an uphill battle.

2.  if you can and will share the printer, I suspect your task is an easy one.

- share the printer on the host that's connected to the printer via USB  (call that host "HOST1" for now and share the printer as LEX1)
- locally or remotely, execute the following commands.
- start -> run -> cmd -> ok
    net use lpt3 \\host1\lex1  /persistent:yes
     exit
start -> run -> control printers -> ok
start the install printer wizard
install a new LOCAL printer, install it on LPT3, use the correct Lexmark driver for it
print a test page
does it work?
0
 

Author Comment

by:srblaney
ID: 21783896
Okay, I left out the face that this is an ip printer in the original post.  I apologize for that.

I am completely familiar with sharing a printer on a workstation and capturing the port.  for the Lexmark, there is software and a driver to connect via tcp/ip, which I found surprising and it works nicely with Windows 98.  Only thing is, I can't capture it.  I have actually already connected Windows 98 to the printer through a Windows XP VPC.  Works good.  Only problem the machine that I was hoping to use it for will not run XP as it's a laptop.  

Anyway, I guess I may have to setup a temporary print server if there isn't a way to capture an IP address to an lpt port.

Does this help?

Steve
0
 
LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
fhmc earned 125 total points
ID: 21783958
I gather you meant, capture an LPT port to an IP address in your last post, not the other way around?

in any case, so far as I'm aware, Windows (all versions) cannot natively map an LPT port to a generic IP printer...  if you want to use an LPT reference to an IP printer in Windows, it's a multi step process that requires some host to share (e.g. provide some sort of proxy type service between the virtual LPT and the IP printer.)  Again, this assertion pertains to NATIVE windows connectivity.

generally speaking, the commonly accepted practice to accomplish this task is as follows.

windows host1, defines a Standard IP printer port to the IP addy of the network printer.
windows host1 installs a driver for that printer and shares it
windows host1 (or some other network available windows host) maps LPTx to the shared printer on host1
after LPTx is mapped, the printer is installed on that host as a local printer on the mapped LPTx port.

e.g.  map lpt1 to port 9100 on IP printer won't work in native windows

define a standard IP port to network printer on "some" windows host, install driver, share printer
any windows host w/ appropriate permissions (including local host) can map lptx to shared printer and use DOS progs to print.

hope this helps.  also, if anyone notices any errors in my assertion, please correct me.




0
 
LVL 43

Expert Comment

by:Steve Knight
ID: 21937892
I would say accept fhmc's last comment as a clear to the point description of how to accomplish the request...

Steve
0

Featured Post

PRTG Network Monitor: Intuitive Network Monitoring

Network Monitoring is essential to ensure that computer systems and network devices are running. Use PRTG to monitor LANs, servers, websites, applications and devices, bandwidth, virtual environments, remote systems, IoT, and many more. PRTG is easy to set up & use.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

VALIDATING DATES One method of validating dates is to jam the date into the DATE command and see if it accepts it by examining the system's errorlevel value. A non-zero result indicates failure. A typical example might look something like the fol…
Ever notice how you can't use a new drive in Windows without having Windows assigning a Disk Signature?  Ever have a signature collision problem (especially with Virtual Machines?)  This article is intended to help you understand what's going on and…
Windows 8 comes with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from the new interface is a Start button and Start Menu. Many users do not like it, much preferring the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows X…
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial s…

830 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question