erasing out of an vector...

I want to iterate through a vector, process some logic on the items determining whether they still belong in the vector. But I'm having trouble figuring out how.

While iterating through, if it's decided that vector element should be remove, you can't erase it right there, because then you cannot contiue iterating the rest of the vector. You would need to contruct a new vector and start over. I thought about saving the index of the vector item I want to remove and erasing them afterwards, but that wont work becase the the item indices will change after I remove the first one.

Any thoughts on how I can swiftly accomplish this?
mattososkyAsked:
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mdnt15Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Ok, so i suppose you use a vector where the elements are pointers to some objects or something.

What you can do, is to create a new vector for the elements that you wanna keep. So you create this new vector, you iterate the old vector, and when you decide that you want to keep an element, you just add that at the end of the new vector. You set the entry of that element to null in the old vector. If you want to delete an element you just free that element and set the entry to null in the old vector.

At the end, you can erase the old vector and return the new one. Or, if you want to keep the pointer of the old vector, you just copy the pointers values from the new vector to the old one.

Is this what you wanted to know?
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evilrixSenior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
Have you considered using a std::list instead? You can remove items from a list without invalidating the iterators.
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evilrixConnect With a Mentor Senior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
>> Have you considered using a std::list instead?
It will also be significantly more efficient to delete from a list as this only involves the unlinking of 2 pointers, when you delete from a vector everything after the position erased has to be shuffled back to fill the gap.
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mattososkyAuthor Commented:
Something I'll look into later, but at this point I'm commited to using the vector, so i need a solution with it.
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evilrixConnect With a Mentor Senior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
Have you tried iterating from the end to the beginning? Only the iterators after the current position are invalidated.

BTW: the interface for list and vector are the same... changing from one to the other is simple.
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mattososkyAuthor Commented:
then would make the itr = vector.end and itr-- until it equals vector.begin?

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mattososkyAuthor Commented:
this isnt working...

deletes the first pass, fails at the second with 'vector iterators incompatible'
vector<string*> str_vector;
	for(int i = 0;i<5;i++)
	{
		string* s = new string("YOYO");
		str_vector.push_back(s);
	}
 
	vector<string*>::iterator itr = str_vector.end();
 
	while(itr!=str_vector.begin())
	{
		itr--;
		str_vector.erase(itr);
	}

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evilrixSenior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
>> then would make the itr = vector.end and itr-- until it equals vector.begin?
Traversing in reverse using forward iterators is tricky and you can't use reverse iterators to erase so you'll have to use indexes...
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
 
int gen()
{
	static int i = -1;
	return ++i;
}
 
typedef std::vector<int> intvec_t;
 
int main()
{
	intvec_t intvec(10);
 
	std::generate(intvec.begin(), intvec.end(), gen);
 
	std::cout << "Display all numbers and remove odd" << std::endl;
 
	intvec_t::size_type st = (intvec.size() - 1);
 
	do
	{
		std::cout << intvec[st] << std::endl;
		if(intvec[st]%2) { intvec.erase(intvec.begin() + st); }
		--st;
	}
	while(st > 0);
 
	std::cout << std::endl << "After all odd items were rmeoved" << std::endl;
	std::copy(intvec.begin(), intvec.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"));
}

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evilrixSenior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
>> string* s = new string("YOYO");
Why push back pointers to string, it can safely be copied into the vector? Putting heap allocated memory into vectors is always problematic... it creates very hard to protect against leakage issues with exceptions.
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jkrCommented:
>>You would need to contruct a new vector and start over.

You won't need a new vector - and a little trick will help:
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
 
void main () {
 
  int tmp[] = { 1,2,3,4,3,2,5,2};
  vector<int> v(&tmp[0],&tmp[7]);
 
  int offs = 0;
 
  vector<int>::iterator i = v.begin();
 
  for (i = v.begin(); i != v.end(); ++i) cout << *i << " ";
 
  i = v.begin();
 
  while(i != v.end()) {
 
    if (*i == 2) { v.erase(i); i = v.begin() + offs; continue;}
 
    ++i;
    ++offs;
  }
  
 
  cout << endl;
  for (i = v.begin(); i != v.end(); ++i) cout << *i << " ";
}

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mattososkyAuthor Commented:
this was just a test. I needed to replicate what my real application is doing. I in placeing pointers in there because this is not the only reference to these objects..
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