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How to get IE7 to accept a jQuery "name" attribute change on a <FORM>

Posted on 2008-06-13
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Last Modified: 2013-12-08
Sorry for the slightly hazy title.
I'm using jQuery and AJAX to load a page containing multiple DIVs with their own individual content, from various areas of our site. 2 of the DIVs I'm loading pull in some forms, however due to a legacy issue all the forms on the site have the same "name", which is "proDep".

I've used jQuery to change the name of the form...
    $('#iDerv form').attr("name", "dervForm");
and Firefox is happy with this and lets me address the 2 forms seperately, "proDep" and "dervForm", but IE just does something wierd that I don't understand.

It now treats "proDep" as a 2 dimensional array, with proDep[0] being "proDep", and proDep[1] being "newName".
I can access all the form fields using "proDep[0][4]" for example, but this is no good as I need to run functions that refer to fields in proDep as a 1d array.

It also then ignores the .append() ; function to add new elements to the form.

Is there a different way to change the name of an element or is this just something that IE can't handle?
// iDerv DIV hidden on load

$('#iDerv').hide();

 

...

...

 

function v3_processModel () {

         // looks at fields in first form

	var formMake = document.proDep.fjs_make.value;

	var formModel = document.proDep.fjs_model.value;

	

         ...

         ...

 

	// loads new content into DIV "iDerv", including another "proDep" form

	url = "pageHoldingproDep.cfm?make="+make;

	updateElem('iDerv',url);	

 

	// reveals the div and changes the form name

	$('#iDerv').show();

	$('#iDerv form').attr("name","dervForm");

	// add new buttons

	$('#iDerv form').append('<input type="submit" onClick="return v3_loadOptions();" value="Add Options">');

	$('#iDerv form').append('<input type="submit" onClick="return v3_processCalcClick();" value="Calculate">');

	return false;

}

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Question by:comcar
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Expert Comment

by:hielo
Comment Utility
try:
$('#iDerv form:eq(0)').attr("name","dervForm");
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Author Comment

by:comcar
Comment Utility
Thanks hielo but that didn't do it I'm afraid. I've found out a few more things... although it's still got me stumped...

The form name does change, according to the IE Developer toolbar, it shows the name as "dervForm", but using DebugBar or Microsoft Script Debugger's console, if I type in;

"document.proDep[1].innerHTML" - get the HTML for the second form...
"document.dervForm.innerHTML" - and this throws a null object error!

I read somewhere about someone having similar sorts of troubles with ammending "onClick" values that IE would ignore, something to do with cloning? Anyone got any ideas?!
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Expert Comment

by:FSIFM
Comment Utility
If you defining the id name I dont think you have to specifiy that it is a form
$('#iDerv').attr("name","dervForm");

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Author Comment

by:comcar
Comment Utility
The ID is for the containing DIV, as shown in the simplified code snippet. The FORM is a child of the DIV, and I've also tried changing the code to:

$('#iDerv > form').attr("name","dervForm");
<div id="iDerv">

  <form name="proDep"></form>

</div>
 

// so with this line of code I'm trying to achieve the bottom example

$('#iDerv > form').attr("name","dervForm");
 

<div id="iDerv">

  <form name="dervForm"></form>

</div>

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LVL 82

Expert Comment

by:hielo
Comment Utility
>>document.proDep[1].innerHTML" - get the HTML for the second form...
Correct. That's because you have two forms with the same name.
document.proDep[0].innerHTML

should give you the first form. As a matter of fact, you can even change the name via:
document.forms[0].name="myForm1";
document.forms[1].name="myForm2";
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Author Comment

by:comcar
Comment Utility
I think I see what the problem is now, the normal Javascript code ignores the changes made by jQuery.

So I need to make the changes initially using "document.getElementById..." and then refer back to them in the same way, and I can only access the jQuery labelled form "dervForm" if I use jQuery functions to call it.

So is the jQuery/$ object just like a mask for the HTML and JS below? In IE at least, as Firefox is happy for me to jump between the 2.
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Author Comment

by:comcar
Comment Utility
Ah no load of nonsense I'm talking.

document.forms[1].name="dervForm"; - still leads to the same thing, I suppose this is because the page is being loaded with the form, the array of 2 proDeps is created, then I'm trying to mess around with it.

I'm going to try to use REGEX to find "form... name="proDep" and change it for "form...name="dervForm" when it comes back from the AJAX call and before it's written to the page
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Assisted Solution

by:hielo
hielo earned 100 total points
Comment Utility
>>So I need to make the changes initially , using "document.getElementById..."
but I thought your <form> tags have NO id. There should be NO DUPLICATE ids throughout the page. If you need to assign ids to the form try:

document.forms[0].id="id1";
document.forms[1].id="id2";
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Accepted Solution

by:
comcar earned 0 total points
Comment Utility
Sorry that was just me making a mistake, my point was that I thought I'd have to make the changes using the standard "document..." notation instead of the jQuery "$('...')" notation. But it didn't work anyway.

Instead I used a javascript ".replace()" call to find "name='proDep'" in the response text and replace it with "name='dervForm'" so IE doesn't get the chance to make the array as the form arrives at the page renamed already.

Thanks for you help guys but I the only easy way to solve it was to change the form before it arrived at the page.
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