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What does @ symbol usually represents within the SQL coding?

I am reviewing SQL coding and I noticed that @ symbol repeats so many times. I am also posting the sample code for you to review.
My question is what is usually represented by @ symbol within SQL.
Thank You, A.

create proc mic_is_in_role
 @RoleName varchar(24) = null,
 @loginId varchar(16) = null
as
--DESCRIPTION: returns 0 if user login id is in role, otherwise returns a value less than 0
set nocount on
 
if (@RoleName is null OR @loginId is null) begin
  return 10201
end  
 
if exists (select *  
           from ncx_roles
           where RoleName = @RoleName
           and LoginId = @loginId) begin
 return 0           -- yes, loginid is in role
 
end else begin
0
gotiva
Asked:
gotiva
  • 2
1 Solution
 
TimCotteeHead of Software ServicesCommented:
Hello gotiva,

The @ symbol is denoting a locally declared variable. In this case as it is a stored procedure, the two variables @RoleName and @LoginID are declared and receive the values passed into the stored procedure. They are then used locally (to the statement batch - in this case the stored procedure) to provide a match for a record in the table ncx_roles against similarly named columns.

Regards,

TimCottee
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powercramCommented:
The @ (at symbol) is equivalent to the START command and is used to run SQL*Plus command scripts.

A single @ symbol runs a script in the current directory (or one specified with a full or relative path, or one that is found in you SQLPATH.

@@ will start a sqlplus script that is in the same directory as the script that called it (relative to the directory of the current script). This is normally used for nested command files.
0
 
TimCotteeHead of Software ServicesCommented:
powercram,

I don't think that applies to MS SQL Server!

TimCottee
0
 
gotivaAuthor Commented:
Thank You.
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