Solved

Calling any java method as thread

Posted on 2008-06-16
3
171 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-29
I have an existing webservices project, with 100+ class files,  each one basically runs a query, and return results.
I need to build some new hits that do several various hits asynchronously.  Then return data.  How can I do this without making a bunch of modifications(or as little as possible) to the various class files.  It needs to be done at this webservice level, I can't have the calling applications do the hits asynchronously.

So my visualized solution is something like:
String a =CallAsThread(ClassLoader.SomeClass.getTheseDBConfigs(),ClassLoader.SomeClass2.getTheseDBConfigs2()));

Where CallAsThread calls the 2 different classes as threads, joins them, gets and returns there results or however this can be accomplished.
0
Comment
Question by:itbeme
3 Comments
 
LVL 92

Accepted Solution

by:
objects earned 250 total points
ID: 21798837
Runnable a = new Runnable()
{
   public void run()
   {
       callOne();
    }
};
Runnable b = new Runnable()
{
   public void run()
   {
       callTwo();
    }
};
Thread t1 = a.start();
Thread t2 = b.start();
t1.join();
t2.join();

0
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 21803555
The secret will be in encapsulation here. You say

>>String a =CallAsThread...

Does this mean that you want the result to be in some way a concatenation of strings that are the results of the independent queries?
0
 
LVL 3

Author Closing Comment

by:itbeme
ID: 31467820
To be able to do the way suggested I declared a new thread object passing the Runnable object as a paremeter

          Thread t1 = new Thread (new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                        results1=doThis1();
                        }
                    }
             );
        Thread t2 = new Thread (new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                  results2=doThis2();
                        }
                    }
             );
             t1.start();
             t2.start();
          t1.join();
          t2.join();

Thanks
0

Featured Post

Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Protect jar file - windows app 2 38
Understanding websocket example in spring 1 57
What is JNDI datasource in spring 1 50
Python Assistance 7 73
Java contains several comparison operators (e.g., <, <=, >, >=, ==, !=) that allow you to compare primitive values. However, these operators cannot be used to compare the contents of objects. Interface Comparable is used to allow objects of a cl…
This was posted to the Netbeans forum a Feb, 2010 and I also sent it to Verisign. Who didn't help much in my struggles to get my application signed. ------------------------- Start The idea here is to target your cell phones with the correct…
Viewers learn about the “for” loop and how it works in Java. By comparing it to the while loop learned before, viewers can make the transition easily. You will learn about the formatting of the for loop as we write a program that prints even numbers…
This theoretical tutorial explains exceptions, reasons for exceptions, different categories of exception and exception hierarchy.

911 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

20 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now