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Limit internet usage on ASA 5520

We had a 10mb/s connection for the company.  We have a company that will be uploading extremely large files overnight that would require much greater speeds.  We have gotten 'bursting' enabled at our ISP so we can have transfer rates above our 10mb connection.  The ISP charges extra for traffic using the 'bursting' so we need to throttle the overall usage for everyone during the day.

Right now, I don't really care about the overnight upload requiring the extra speeds because that isn't happening for another week, so if that makes the situation more complex I just need to be able to throttle the connection.  The company has already signed up for the extra speeds and we are being charged.

I am reading http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/vpndevc/ps2030/products_tech_note09186a008084de0c.shtml
but honestly I don't know if that is what I'm looking for.  From a document in the help area of the ASA5520 I found this :

     Rule Actions > QoS Tab
     Add/Edit Service Policy Rule Wizard > Rule Actions > QoS Tab (You can get to this tab through various        
     paths.)
     The QoS tab lets you apply strict scheduling priority and rate-limit traffic.
     Restrictions
     Policing traffic in the inbound direction is not supported.
     You cannot enable both priority and policing together.

"Policing Traffic in the inbound direction is not supported" was the part that threw me.  I'm not the strongest Cisco guy, and the boss is on vacation.

I could really use some guidance.  I can provide details, but I honestly don't know if I need "Policing" "Traffic Shaping" or "Priority queueing".  I am on a time crunch for this, and appreciate any help.

Thanks.
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gracewild
Asked:
gracewild
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1 Solution
 
raptorjb007Commented:
The ASA only has two types of QoS. The first is Priority traffic, this is a simple traffic class that you define that has priority above all other traffic. The second one is policing, this is a simple bandwidth limit applied outbound on an interface for traffic you define, all traffic above the limit is dropped.

So, if you want to limit bandwidth usage you need to use policing. You define the traffic that needs to be limited then set a limit and apply it to an interface.

If you need, I can assist you with configuring policing.
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gracewildAuthor Commented:
raptorjb007: Thanks for your reply.

"The second one is policing, this is a simple bandwidth limit applied outbound on an interface for traffic you define, all traffic above the limit is dropped."

Would I then be correct in assuming that incoming traffic from the internet or ftp from within our firewall would not be limited?

So Johnny sitting on the downstream side of the firewall downloads large file from the internet.  Is that technically 'incoming' since it was from the internet, or is that technically outbound, since the request came from here?
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raptorjb007Commented:
With regards to a host on the inside of your firewall downloading a file from a server on the outside, the connection would be initiated outbound, but the traffic flow, the actual data from the file download would be considered inbound traffic as far as policing is concerned..
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gracewildAuthor Commented:
Thank you for letting me know what I'm into.
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