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How are these DLLs referenced???

Posted on 2008-06-18
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I have inherrited a .NET solution and am trying to figure out how certain DLLs are making it into the bin directory when compiled even though they are not referenced.

Can anyone help me learn how this is happening? I need to include a new dll in the same manner as these are being included.

Thank you!
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Question by:HangTenDesign
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4 Comments
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:William
ID: 21817226
If you have an assembly that references 'another' asssembly it will be pulled in... You can also set them to be copied local:true|false
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LVL 55

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by:Jaime Olivares
ID: 21818104
also them could be declared as dependencies.
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LVL 5

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by:JuckMan
ID: 21818302
If you are using VS the right click on references folder and select "Add references". This will add the selected assembly in to your project and that assembly will be copied in to your bin folder.

If you add reference to a assembly which is in the GAC then that assembly by default would not be copied to your bin folder. (called shared assembles). If is not in GAC (called private assemblies) then a copy will be made in to the bin folder. This architecture is to support XCOPY deployment.
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HangTenDesign earned 0 total points
ID: 21869167
I found a setting under Project --> [Project] Properties in Visual Studio called Build Events. The assemblies that are being pulled in are defined in the "Post Build Events" area. Once I added the same command line there, the DLLs got copied to the other Projects bin directory without the referrence. This is how the others were set up as well.

Thanks all for your input but I found this on my own.
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