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Migrate Vista Workgroup Profile to Domain Profile

Posted on 2008-06-19
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Last Modified: 2012-08-13
My company recently expanded and we have to migrate all our Vista clients from a workgroup to a domain. A lot of our staff have very customised profiles and want all their local profile settings transferred to their domain profile equivalent.

Moveuser.exe is not compatible with Vista and has been replaced with Win32_UserProfile WMI functionality as explained in the following Microsoft article:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/930955

Unfortunately they forgot to explain how this relates to moveuser.exe and transferring local profiles to domain profiles - The scripts at the bottom do sweet f*ck all.

Has anyone overcome this hurdle? Please help!

 
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Question by:cpadm
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5 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

by:
LauraEHunterMVP earned 250 total points
ID: 21822324
I think the tool of choice (though I'll tell you up front that I haven't tried it in the scenario you're describing) is the User State Migration Tool.  Basically you copy off the current profile with the /scanstate option, then do what you're going to do (join the domain, in this case), and then reload the profile with the /loadstate option. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/appcompat/aa905115.aspx

Take a look, see if it yields any joy.
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Author Comment

by:cpadm
ID: 21822544
I've read a few articles about USMT 3.0 (User State Migration Tool) - This tool allows you to migrate profiles in Vista. Unfortunately, I can't figure how to migrate a local profile into a domain profile. Here's what I picked up from the Microsoft support webpage:

http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsVista/en/library/91f62fc4-621f-4537-b311-1307df0105611033.mspx?mfr=true

> 1. Log on to the source computer as an administrator, and specify:
>
> scanstate \\fileserver\migration\mystore /ue:*\* /ui:MyLocalUserAccount
>  /i:miguser.xml /i:migapp.xml /o
>
> 2. Log on to the destination computer as an administrator.
>
> 3. Specify the following:
>
> loadstate \\fileserver\migration\mystore /mu:MyLocalUserAccount:MyNewDomain\MyDomainUserAccount
> /i:miguser.xml /i:migapp.xml
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Assisted Solution

by:alikaz3
alikaz3 earned 250 total points
ID: 21823651
There is a much easier tool, if you are willing to pay a little:

http://www.forensit.com/Profwiz/index.htm

ForensiT's User Profile Wizard

"The User Profile Wizard is free for personal use, subject to the terms of the End User Agreement. To request an evaluation copy of the Corporate Edition, and for pricing information, corporate customers and organizations should contact sales@ForensiT.com. Your organization will pay no more than $2 per seat for the Corporate Edition."

My favorite feature is that it moves your files, rather than making a huge USMT backup file that you just end up restoring from right away. With this tool, you open it logged on as administrator, type in the username you are going to use, the domain you are going to connect to, and what folder you want to pull settings from. It even has a feature to "share" profiles between the local and domain usernames:

"Why share profiles when migrating to a Windows domain?
As far as Windows is concerned, when you logon to your machine using your domain logon you are a completely different person. Because Windows thinks you're a different person, it sets up a new profile for you and you lose all your personal settings. Not only that, unless your new domain account has Administrator rights on your machine, you lose access to all your data as well. What the User Profile Wizard allows you to do is share your original profile with your new domain logon so that you can carry on using your old settings. This is a major benefit to your users. Installing a Windows Domain infrastructure is a major undertaking but, believe it or not, your end users won't be as excited about it as you: all they want to do is get on with their jobs. Using the User Profile Wizard will significantly reduce disruption to your business."
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Expert Comment

by:alikaz3
ID: 21823660
**open it logged on as a (local) administrator
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Author Comment

by:cpadm
ID: 21847897
Cheers lads for your help. I found an alternative quick and easy way to do it in the end - It turns out that the "Windows Easy Transfer" wizard is a GUI for USMT, but without having to download the msi from Microsoft, then having to install it, and register the exe's in the environmental variables for easy command line use. This is what worked for me, and it's quick (I have a 700MB local profile and I transferred it my domain profile in approx 20 minutes.

1) >>Start>>All Programs>>Accessories>>System Tools>>Windows Easy Transfer
2) >>Next
3) >>Close All (If you have an applications opened)
4) >>Select which profile, settings, folders that you want transferred
5) >>Select the location of where you want to import your profile (You can import it to a flash drive, external USB hard disk, network share, or even your own local disk, which is by far the quickest option)
6) A profile flat file is created, and when you double click the file, it asks you where do you want to export the profile to. I wanted to export it into my new domain profile, which was selectable from the drop down combo box.
7) When the transfer completes, you will be prompted to restart.
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