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MS SQL 2005 DBCC SHRINKDATABASE

Posted on 2008-06-19
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Last Modified: 2008-06-19
I deleted a massive amount of data (6GB) from the database last night due to someone backing up massive tables in  a production environment.  I noticed this from the size of the backup increasing by 6GB.  After I truncated and dropped the tables, I performed a DBCC SHRINKDATABASE.  The new backup is 13GB, which is the expected size without the unnecessary deleted tables.  

My question is, why has the size of the backup decreased, but the size of the MDF file is still 19GB?

I performed - DBCC SHRINKDATABASE ('DBNAME',TRUNCATEONLY)

Thanks in advance!

Rob
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Question by:transitcenter
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by:ScottPletcher
ID: 21824031
You need to reorg / rebuild the table(s) involved (with a strong preference for rebuild if possible after such large delete(s)).  Otherwise, the freed space is still spread out in the table, and so the total size is not necessarily reduced.
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by:transitcenter
ID: 21824983
But I dropped the tables involved.  How can I rebuild tables that are dropped?
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Expert Comment

by:ScottPletcher
ID: 21825316
D'OH, I overlooked that.

Run the shrink w/o specifying a parameter, allowing SQL to move the pages around to use less total space:

DBCC SHRINKDATABASE ( 'DBNAME' )
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by:transitcenter
ID: 21825548
Thank you! But one last question...should I provide a percent that the database should save? Also, won't this take a long time on a 13GB database?
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ScottPletcher earned 125 total points
ID: 21825879
That will be tricky if you don't know the proper %.  I wouldn't worry about it that much.

Yes, it will take a while, depending on the drive speed.  But it shouldn't be that bad.
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Author Comment

by:transitcenter
ID: 21826010
Thank you!
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by:ScottPletcher
ID: 21826658
Np.

Ironically you can hurt your overall db performance by doing that shrink.  If you have key tables and indexes, you should check them -- DBCC SHOWCONTIG() -- and rebuild them if needed.
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