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Basic file sharing question for W2K3 Server

Posted on 2008-06-20
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Last Modified: 2013-12-02
I feel like an idiot asking this question but something so simple and basic is driving me insane.

I come from a Netware world where creating a "GROUPS" folder and then creating/sharing the individual group's folders is very easy. It's all done from the top down so that I can map a drive the the top of the directory structure (e.g. G:\GROUPS) and then depending on the users rights they will see other folders for their specific group inside the G:\ drive.

With Windows Server 2003 Standard using AD I am having a hell of a time recreating this setup. All I want to do is map a drive for each user to the top of the directory structure (G:\GROUPS) and let them see what is inside. If they belong to an AD group that has permissions to the folders beneath they can either read only or read/write to them. I have spent the past few hours trying every combination of share permissions, security permissions, inheritance crap and so forth.

Here is what I am trying to do:

C:\FILESERV - is the top of my shared directory structure

C:\FILESERV\GROUPS - is shared with "Everyone" having read only rights

C:\FILESERV\GROUPS\Accounting - is not specifically shared but has rights for the "Accounting" group to read/write (even tried full access)

What is happening is that members of the "Accounting" group and everyone else can see the folder but if you try to write to it, it fails. if I go back up to the "GROUPS" folder and give "Everyone" the "change" permission under sharing, everyone can write to it.

What on Earth am i doing wrong? This should be so simple!
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Question by:jasonsfa98
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by:tigermatt
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You're not assigning Full Control permissions to the Everyone group on the Share permissions level. Since the most restrictive permissions will always apply - and you get a lot more control over what actions a user can take by using NTFS permissions - using share permissions is virtually useless.

Give the Everyone group full control in the Share permissions on EVERY share you create is the easiest way to do it. The permissions on the Security tab will still be applied to connections to the share, despite making this change.

-tigermatt
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by:jasonsfa98
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Ok. So I added the Full Control permission at the top (C:\FILESERV\GROUPS). Then, I created a folder inside that one named "Accounting". I didn't assign any share permissions but added the Accounting group to the Security tab. I gave the Accounting group full control and "Users" read only.

I am still able to write to the directory no matter who I am.

-C:\
 |_
     C:\FILESERV
     |_
          C:\FILESERV\Accounting <--- This one should be read by all but only written to by the Accounting group.
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by:tigermatt
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Sorry I misread it and thought it said you couldn't write!

Can you please list all the users/groups on the Security tab along with a brief summary of the permissions they are granted. Don't forget that if a user is a member of two groups, their permissions are based on the permissions granted to both those groups.
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by:Qlemo
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I agree. Only if you want to have ReadOnly-Shares versus ReadWrite-Shares (same folder, different names), there might be a sense in setting up share permissions. In any other case it is like begging for trouble ...
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by:Andres Perales
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You also have to remember if you are a Domain admin, or have admin right you will be able to do all of it with that account...you should also be testing it from the sharing unc not the directory so

\\fileserv\
\\fileserv\accounting

then check from a normal account.
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by:jasonsfa98
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peralesa: I am using an account that is a member of the Accounting group to test all this. I then remove them from the group to see if the ability to write is taken away and it's not.

Responding to Tigermatt shortly ...
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by:jasonsfa98
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tigermatt,

C:\FILESERV\GROUPS:

Security Tab
Administrators - Allow Full Control
CREATOR OWNER - Allow Special
SYSTEM - Full Control
Users - Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, Read


C:\FILESERV\GROUPS\Accounting:

Security Tab
Administrators - Allow Full Control
Accounting Group - Allow Full Control
CREATOR OWNER - Allow Special
SYSTEM - Full Control
Users - Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, Read


Current Situation: Anyone and their mother can write to the Accounting directory.

Needed Situation: Only the Accounting group should be able to write/change while all other users should be able to read.
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by:virtuatech
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Your share, like tigermatt said, should have "Full Control" permissions.  What really matters is the Security tab of the properties of the Accounting folder.  Keep in mind that the Security settings of the C:\ and C:\FileServ...if any of the users have access to those, it will inherit to the subfolders, the Accounting folder.  To get around this you should go to the Security tab of the Accounting folder properties, then click the "Advanced" button and uncheck the "Inherit from parent..." box.  That will exclude all the other users, and only admit the users specified.

I hope that helps :)
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tigermatt earned 500 total points
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OK, let's start a permission at a time. On the Accounting folder, remove inheritance in Advanced Security permissions, and select the option to Copy permissions. Then, remove each permission one at a time and test using a non-Administrator, non-Creator, non-Accounting user account. When you find the permission entry you remove which stops these people writing files, post back here.
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by:Andres Perales
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man you guys are fast was just going to say what tiger and virtuatech were going to say...

share permissions full,

security or NTFS permissions make sure to turn of the inheritance, then remove from there except the groups you want to have full access.
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by:virtuatech
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Typing Tutor baby, Typing Tutor ;)
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by:jasonsfa98
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tigermatt,

So I did exactly what you said (something I tried many times) and this time I added a Logoff/Logon to the mix and it worked. The user was no longer able to write to the directory. Then, I added the user back to the Accounting group in AD. After that, I logged in as the user and was now able to write again. Even I after I tested it some more with a Logoff/Logon there seemed to be some lag as to how much time passed before permissions were applied. Is this normal?

Do I have to have users Logout/Login every time a group membership is changed?
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by:Andres Perales
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There is a lag time sometimes in permissions, there are times where we have changed permissions so many times on a folder, that AD does not have time to catch up...we get up for a break come back and it all works like magic...or the gremlins come and help
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Author Comment

by:jasonsfa98
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peralesa, that is annoying!

I know people think Netware is dead but when it comes to basic file/print services ... MUCH EASIER to work with. Even without the fancy GUI's.

Tigermatt ... thanks man.
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Author Closing Comment

by:jasonsfa98
Comment Utility
This is by the book. This is the same information you can find in the manuals but tigermatt took it step by step and allowed me to discover the problem. He pointed me in the right direction and now all is well. Sometimes you just need another set of eyes.
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by:Andres Perales
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<shrugs>
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