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No value given for required parameter error when updating access table

I am updating an access table, the table only has two columns, and one row at all times.

Basically it i an old-school way for us to track sessions.  When I try and execute the following SQL statement I receive a run-time error stating that No value was given for one or more required parameters.

Update tblEmployeeID Set EmpID=86, EmpPw='Uty33SoWR'

I have also tried it with double qupte around the password

THanks
Joshua
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HolmesSPH
Asked:
HolmesSPH
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1 Solution
 
Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
is EmpID an autonumber?

Update tblEmployeeID Set  EmpPw='Uty33SoWR' where EmpID=86
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
Offhand the SQL looks correct, assuming EmpID is numeric and EmpPw is a string.

Any chance you mis-spelled either tblEmployeeID (maybe tblEmployee?), EmpID, or EmpPw?
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HolmesSPHAuthor Commented:
EmpId is not auto number, but it is numeric, and EmpPw is a Text type.

If I try this SQL statement

Update tblEmployeeID Set EmpID=86

if works, however it's when I add the EmpPw data that I get the error.  Also, I can tell by capricorn1's post that I wasn't clear enough, this table one has one record, so in the update statement where is no need to use a where clause.  When we update this table/record we always update the same record, there is never more then one :-)
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
how about this

Update tblEmployeeID Set  EmpPw='Uty33SoWR'

does it work?
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HolmesSPHAuthor Commented:
Nope, I tried that, thought maybe I would just do two separate queries but that query fails.  When I update on EmpPw is when I get the error... It's odd, I swear I've never seen such wierd things in my entire life until I started working on this Access DB for this company lol
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
can you open the table in design view and see the field names and data  types.


or better if you can  attach your db here, check the Attach File below
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HolmesSPHAuthor Commented:
lol, yeah, but before any one else tries to attempt this one, let me just say that I've been programming for almost 8 years now, VB, VBA, VB.NET, C#, C, PHP, Perl yada yada... lol I've tried every "simple" mistake there is out there already.

Now in regards to attaching the database, I can't do that, it's 40 megs.

But the columns are as follows;

EmpID:
Long Integer
Decimals Auto
Default 0
Required 0
Indexed Yes Duplicated ok

EmpPw:
Text
Field Size 50
Required No
Allow Zero Length Yes
Indexed no Unicode Compression Yes

Other then that... there's really nothing else in the table.. All I did was add the EmpPw column and add it to the query str...  :-)
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
create a blank db and import the table tblEmployeeID  ( attach this db here)

try your query again in the new db

also try doing a Compact and Repair if you haven't done so.

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HolmesSPHAuthor Commented:
oddly enough a compact/repair did it... Doesn't make much sense to me lol but all well.. thanks :-)
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HolmesSPHAuthor Commented:
I should mention as well that I tried (before the compact repair) to use the decompile command from the command line.

> Path To Microsoft Office
> msaccess /decompile nameOfDatabase.mdb

This command has helped me out a lot while doing serious VBA work, but it appears the problem I was having couldn't have been caused by the VBA code I guess, the compact repair must have refreshed something because the table was an access table not a  linked table like 90% of the database... Interesting case lol
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
info here re Compact and repair

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/209769/EN-US/
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