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SSL Installation Problems

Hello,

I am having some issues with the installation of an SSL certificate.  I purchased one from GoDaddy, but am using one from RapidSSL as a test.  

In one of my previous posts I asked if there would be any issues with keeping my internal domain as a .com when we also have a ISP hosted website with the same name.  I believe that is where the problem is coming from.

This is the guide I have been using to set up the SSL cert. (http://www.petri.co.il/configure_ssl_on_your_website_with_iis.htm).  Are there any particular steps I need to do differently?  Maybe like Step 11, where it asks for the common name.  What do I need to put in there?  My domain name?  Server name?

Main reason I'm installing this certificate is to enable the use of RPC over HTTP(S).

If I have left any info that you may need, please let me know.

Thank you.
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Lucho305
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Lucho305
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1 Solution
 
Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

Hi there,

> In one of my previous posts I asked if there would be any issues with keeping my
> internal domain as a .com when we also have a ISP hosted website with the same name.

There's no problem with that. At least nothing that will impact SSL.

The Common Name is the name used to access the site. That is, if you have a web-site on www.yourdomain.com and wanted to use SSL then you would use a common name of www.yourdomain.com.

Chris
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Lucho305Author Commented:
The SSL cert is not going to be used for the website itself (which is hosted by an ISP that has MX records pointing back to office server, for Exchange purposes) but for RPC over HTTPS and OWA (which currently is located at http://mail.mydomain.com/exchange).  If that makes any sense.
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

It does make sense and that's fine :)

The common name used in the certificate needs to match the name you use to access the service (whatever that happens to be).

So if your target is https://mail.mydomain.com for RPC over HTTPS then the common name should be mail.mydomain.com. That allows it to negotiate encryption without bringing up warnings about the validity of the certificate.

There are different kinds of certificate that allow greater freedom in the name used; Wildcard and Subject Alternate Name (SAN) certificates for example. The latter is really useful for Exchange 2007 because of the large number of different services within Exchange that use SSL.

And just to touch of the local domain naming slightly. Because certificates are bound to a name, it doesn't matter which IP you use to access a service. So if mail.yourdomain.com resolves to an internal IP inside your network, but an external IP outside it will remain valid for both.

Chris
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Lucho305Author Commented:
That's probably the reason it didn't work.  I was using mydomain.com as the common name.  I am leaving the office right now, but will try when I get home.  I will let you know the results.  Thanks for the quick responses.
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

Cool okay :)

Just yell if you still have problems, I'll be off to bed in a short while so don't worry if there's no immediate reply.

Have a good journey.

Chris
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Lucho305Author Commented:
Ok, I'm back.  I couldn't write back over the weekend because my internet at home was down.

I followed your advice and now it is working 100%.  Thank you for all your help! :)
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Lucho305Author Commented:
Thank you for taking the time to help me :)
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

You're welcome, glad it's working :)

Chris
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