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As400 and Aix Systems Backup to Disk

Posted on 2008-06-22
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I'm the new Sys Admin at my comany which is a 98% Windows shop execpt for two servers on is running As400 and the other is an Aix system both of which host mission critical applications. Right now we are using Netbackup for all of our server backups but both of the As400 and Aix system backup to a local tape drive attached to them directly. I have read that netbackup does not support these remote OS's natively but there are third party plug-ins that will interface with netbackup but they are very expensive. Can the Aix & As400 server backup to a network share on a windows server then have this share be backed up by Netbackup..please advise......
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Question by:compdigit44
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Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 21842573
None can backup to Windows share.

Veritas has AIX netbackup client that does not do full mksysb backup, which is required for AIX system upgrades and hardware repairs.
(imagine NT recovery diskette)
Tivoli Storage Manager has some support, but still a local tape is required for recovery. (One can even load AIX system from install tape without using CD-ROM)

AS/400 has Tivoli API that functionally replaces tape system, but tape system backup is still required for upgrades etc.
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by:theo kouwenhoven
ID: 21844810
theoretically, you can save the AS/400 files to a save file, move that th a server and write it to a "net-tapeunit", but I never tried it.
But standard, nope, no netbackup
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by:compdigit44
ID: 21845061
Interesting how here is a long shot...Is it even possible to have the As400 server to Aix server backup to a virtaul tape library that is really just a network share???? Any thoughts???
http://www.lxicorp.com/solutions/virtual_tape_library.html
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by:tliotta
ID: 21849079
compdigit44:

I can't answer for AIX beyond saying "probably, but I don't know how."

For AS/400 and any of its successors, the answer is "Definitely yes, but I am not aware of any product that does it." I could write such a backup procedure (and have written related ones), so I know how it would be done. Save and restore APIs are available for it.

However, it isn't something that would be very likely to be done by someone who isn't already comfortable with similar APIs and backup/restore features.

For less experienced developers and administrators, the ability to save into a "save-file" would be the likely way to go. The fundamental obstacle is almost always the amount of spare disk space that's needed. The save-file (*SAVF) is a native object and must be created and written to through native interfaces. It cannot be a stream-file such as would be used by Windows.

A second possibility would be the recent "virtual tape" solution. This also has the same requirement for spare disk space, but can be manipulated in ways that are more easily integrated into Windows strategies.

Perhaps the biggest concern is that the need for 'backups' implies the need for 'restores'. It would do absolutely no good to backup to a Windows area if the eventual restore required mounting an AS/400-formatted tape (or CD or DVD or...). That is especially true when the backup contains system objects such as operating system programs and user profiles or user authorities/permissions.

This really shouldn't be a project to "backup to Windows" at the start. It should start with reviewing both how and why objects are backed up and what the restore strategies are. E.g., does the current backup involve a 'full-system save'? does it involve IBM libraries? PTFs? Security data? Are user libraries saved as individual libraries or as a set? Are database files journaled?

If the current strategy doesn't fit within a scheme that makes Windows storage feasible, then it might not be worth going in that direction.

Tom
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gheist earned 2000 total points
ID: 21853041
Both AS/400 and AIX works only with IBM hardware. No virtual libraries etc.
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by:gheist
ID: 21984626
Let me suggest looking into iSCSI options (costly servers for windows, included in Solaris or Linux or in NetBSD)
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