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Programtically Importing  XML into Access Database Tables

Posted on 2008-06-23
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Last Modified: 2013-11-29
MS Access 2003 has a great Imprt utility for XML.   I would like to accomplish the same task programtically using C#,   I have search the Google over and never found a true solution.  Does anyone here have specific approach.    

I can easily read the XML into a dataset  but how to get that in MS Access?  
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Question by:DylanJones1
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8 Comments
 
LVL 96

Expert Comment

by:Bob Learned
ID: 21849148
You could read the XML into a DataSet, and then import the rows from the XML file into another table that is bound to the Access database, and then update the database.
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Author Comment

by:DylanJones1
ID: 21849329
Yes that is the path I am heading down  I was, of course, hoping for something that would leverage the work that the import feature has already accomplished.     Can you tell me  what I need to do to get my window service to look at its own config file rather than the machine.config?  

This
onfiguration config = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetupInformation.ApplicationBase);

and this
//for testing my service
Configuration config = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(System.Windows.Forms.Application.ExecutablePath)

both bomb out

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LVL 96

Expert Comment

by:Bob Learned
ID: 21849382
What are you trying to get from the config file?
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Author Comment

by:DylanJones1
ID: 21849458
A few paths, a databse name,  a file filter.   I need to read the config file
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LVL 96

Accepted Solution

by:
Bob Learned earned 500 total points
ID: 21849565
If you get them from the appSettings section, you should be able to use ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.
0
 

Author Comment

by:DylanJones1
ID: 21849674
Here is my code -  this is a windows service that I am debugging via a fom

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="DatabaseUpdaterRemotePath" value="Y:\IPB\Dch" />
    <add key="DatabaseUpdaterLocalPath" value="C:\IPXML\Dch" />
    <add key="DatabaseUpdaterFilter" value="*.XML*" />
    <add key="DatabaseUpdaterIncludeSubs" value="true" />
    <add key="DatabaseName" value="Disconnected.MDB"/>
  </appSettings>
</configuration>

onfiguration config = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetupInformation.ApplicationBase);

and this
//for testing my service
Configuration config = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(System.Windows.Forms.Application.ExecutablePath)

Then
RemotePath = config.AppSettings["DatabaseUpdaterRemotePath"].ToString();

this blows up and the appsettings are empty - it is automatically pulling from machine.config


0
 
LVL 96

Expert Comment

by:Bob Learned
ID: 21849817
Did you try this?

string remotePath = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DatabaseUpdaterRemotePath"];
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Author Comment

by:DylanJones1
ID: 21850074
Yes That does not work either
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