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Best Way to Bring NT4 Server into a Server 2003 Domain

Posted on 2008-06-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
Environment:

NT4 Server at SP6. It hosts applications that we need to keep and that only run on NT4. Currently the domain controller.
Server 2003 Standard. Currently a standalone server.
10 workstations which are currently in the NT4 domain.

We want to promote the Server 2003 server to a domain controller and bring the NT4 box into the new domain. What's the best way to accomplish this? It has been a long time since I touched an NT4 box but I think that simply demoting the NT4 box to a standalone or member server, promoting the 2003 box to a domain controller and putting the NT4 box in the new domain will work.

We only have about 10 users so I don't really need to export anything from the NT4 domain. I am planning to input the user accounts manually - we need to standardize usernames/passwords anyway. I can also put the workstations in the new domain manually as there are not many of them.

Is this an acceptable way of accomplishing my goal? If not, please advise as to the preferred procedure.
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Question by:gbrooke
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HeinoSkov earned 2000 total points
ID: 21852760
I would bring up a new server with NT4 and make it a BDC in the existing domain. Then promote it to PDC and then upgrade to Windows Server 2003. This would raise your domain to Windows Server 2003 and get all current users, groups and computer objects migrated with you

This is the safest path in my opinion. The reason for installing a new NT 4 BDC is that you get a clean install of your Domain controller.

Your current NT will then be a BDC in the Windows Server 2003 domain. You should however try getting 2 Windows Server 2003 Domain Controllers up and then remove the NT4 machine as domain controller. Can be easily done with UPromote http://utools.com/UPromote.asp, which I have used plenty of times - and without one single problem.
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by:HeinoSkov
ID: 21852767
Oh I misread your question.

Well you cant demote a NT4 domain  controller. Simply its not supported by Microsoft.

Use the utility I linked to above. Then your suggestion will work. Demote it to standalone and join the domain afterwards.
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Author Closing Comment

by:gbrooke
ID: 31470047
Thanks for the help, HeinoSkov.
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