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Best practice for assign DHCP scope options for remote office

We have two DHCP/DNS servers in our Headquarter (HQ) and one DHCP/DNS server in each remote office.  I am trying to properly configure the DHCP scope options in these remote offices.  This is what I have:

003 Router                           local gateway address
006 DNS Servers                  local dns server, primary dns server (HQ), local gateway address
044 WINS/NBNS Servers    primary dns server (HQ)
046 WINS/NBT Node Type    0x8

What is the best practice?
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ohmErnie
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ohmErnie
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tigermattCommented:
Best method is to ensure the local DNS server in the site is a Domain Controller which is running the DNS service. Your DNS should be Active Directory-integrated, meaning it automatically replicates between your DNS server through Active Directory replication.

There is no need for you to include the DNS server at HQ as an alternate DNS server, but you can do so if you wish. Bear in mind that all the records stored on the HQ DNS will automatically be replicated and can be resolved by local DNS. Having the HQ DNS would just add resilience to your system.

I cannot see any other issues with your setup, other than to ensure a) You are using AD-integrated DNS, and b) You configure DNS forwarders to forward to a DNS server at the ISP. http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/EE992253-235E-4FD4-B4DA-7E57E70AD3821033.mspx

-tigermatt
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ohmErnieAuthor Commented:
I noticed that in my remote location forwarders to my ISP DNS were not configured.  However, they were in the headquarters.  What type of disadvantage was I at by not having them configured?
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tigermattCommented:
The difference was that DNS queries for external DNS domains on the Internet would have taken longer to process, since the queries would have been passed to root nameservers and then all the way up through the DNS namespace to the nameserver for the domain being looked up. In most cases, the DNS servers at the ISP will have a very large DNS cache to quickly return this information - and if they happen to not have a cache of a particular domain, they would be able to execute a query against other nameservers much quicker than smaller DNS infrastructures like yours can.

So while your DNS queries still work, they may be slower than would be expected without having forwarders configured.
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tigermattCommented:
Thank you, ohmErnie!
-tigermatt
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