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How would you forward all traffic from your laptop to your home computer in order to use your home internet connection?

Posted on 2008-06-25
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Last Modified: 2013-12-26
I've been on several networks that have their firewalls set to prevent UDP traffic, this of course effectively prevents a couple of programs I would like to use from running.
I'm not sure what I'm thinking of is the best way to do things, but I'd like to set up some way where I could pass all the traffic from my laptop to my home server and then shoot it out over my home internet connection.
I've been able to establish openVPN TCP tunnels to my home computer so I know I can at least create a basic VPN over these networks.
However, I'm unsure what I need to do to past that point... I don't have any experience with proxies so I'm not sure if that's the best route to take or what programs I would need to set something like that up.

Using windowsXP on the laptop, server 2003 on the home server. The programs I'm trying to get to work include video/chat clients and a couple games, everquest 2 in particular.
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Question by:FirebornX
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by:dbanttari
ID: 21868098
Go to your VPN connection on your client, go to Properties, Networking, TCP/IP, Advanced, and check the box labeled, "Use default gateway on remote network".

This will send all packets not destined for a locally attached network via the VPN.

If you then can't ping the router on your home network, you may need to add a route on it telling it to send packets meant for the VPN to go to the Win2k3 server.
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by:FirebornX
ID: 21880627
I just tried your suggestion but the native windows VPN connection does not connect.

I used openVPN to create a TCP tunnel using the --proto tcp-client and --proto tcp-server switches and that completes successfully, but I'm not sure how to pass UDP traffic over the tunnel, if that's even possible.

any other programs or ideas on how to use openVPN to solve this problem?
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by:dbanttari
ID: 21885439
The OpenVPN "--redirect-gateway" argument does the same thing.
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by:FirebornX
ID: 21885637
I tried the --redirect-gateway switch last night but that didn't work either.

I think it worked in that all the traffic was being redirected to the server but the server wasn't forwarding it to the internet connection. After I used --redirect-gateway my browser wouldn't work and I couldn't ping Google.

There's something missing but I'm not sure what it could be...
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by:dbanttari
ID: 21891040
If your vpn assigns IP addresses from a different subnet, you may have to add a route at your gateway to tell your gateway to forward all VPN packets to your server.
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by:FirebornX
ID: 21918720
Wouldn't the gateway be the router on the network that I have no control over? The only points I can control are the server and my laptop. I could set up a static route in RRAS on my server, but I don't understand routing well enough to create a proper rule for the static route.
When creating a static route the server asks for the network interface (I set the openVPN interface) then a destination, a network mask, a gateway, and metric.

would the destination be my ISP subnet? say the the VPN interface is set to subnet 10.1.1.x and my static IP provided by the ISP is 208.127.66.50 (this would be assigned to my physical NIC). Would I set the destination to 208.127.66.0 with a mask of 255.255.255.0 and try to forward to that network segment or would I set the destination to 208.127.66.50 with mask of 255.255.255.255, or would I instead try to point the destination directly at the ISP's router IP address?
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dbanttari earned 300 total points
ID: 21937635
If your VPN subnet is 10.1.1.x then you must configure your server to do NAT between the VPN and the "real" interface.  Then you'll have no issues with routing on devices you don't control.
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