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Recovering Deleted .sql File

Posted on 2008-06-25
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Last Modified: 2010-03-19
Hello, I am guessing this is hopeless but I'm really desperate and need some advice.  I'm pretty sure ya'll are gonna tell me I'm screwed...but I'm still gonna ask.

I just got a new laptop at work and somehow, they did not copy over a .sql file I needed and instead...deleted it!  It wasn't even in the recycle bin... it was just wiped off.  

I went online and downloaded WinUndelete and did a search for the file on my old desktop.  I found it... recovered it.  But it was in "poor" condition, so I'm guessing that's why when I try to open it, it goes into Notepad and all I see is a bunch of garbage.  The file recovered is 29KB and is recognized as a sql server file.

This procedure took me like 4 months to write and I'm desperate to get it back.  Is there a better recovery program I can use or some way I can repair the sql file?  

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:Roxanne25
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15 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:sbagireddi
ID: 21869076
Norton Disk Doctor is very  good and has helped me in the past.

There are a lot of tools which promise a lot and do not deliver, instead their recovery process messes up things.
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:sbagireddi
ID: 21869082
Also if this was windows xp and a restore point was set , it may help to go back to that point in time.
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Author Comment

by:Roxanne25
ID: 21869092
ok I will give norton a try... I thought disk doctor only did like disk defragging?
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:sbagireddi
ID: 21869105
They have a search and rescue tool as well.
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Author Comment

by:Roxanne25
ID: 21869169
Oooooh.... it says it has a system restore available for the date I need.  I didn't know our work computers were doing restore points.... will that actually restore the files that were deleted?
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:sbagireddi
ID: 21869193
I just realised that it will not recover deleted files. That applies only to the win xp settings.
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Author Comment

by:Roxanne25
ID: 21869222
:(  You got my hopes all up.
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Author Comment

by:Roxanne25
ID: 21869252
I can't find anything on the symantec site called norton disk doctor... do they still make it or is it bundled with another application?
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LVL 8

Accepted Solution

by:
sbagireddi earned 2000 total points
ID: 21869399
They had an old Program called Undelete which they discontinued.
Now they have something called Norton Save and Restore, but based on what I read, it undeletes only if the backup has been taken prior with the same tool.

PC world here rates the best programs. I would get a trial of the best and go with that.
http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/collection/collid,1295-order,1-c,downloads/files.html
0
 

Author Comment

by:Roxanne25
ID: 21870335
Is there any way I can repair the file that I retrieved?  Windows recognizes it as a sql server file....but when I try to open it, it goes to Notepad and is all garbage.
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:sbagireddi
ID: 21870364
It means that the file may have been damaged or incorrectly recovered.
Your best bet is to use one of the tools from Pc world.
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Author Comment

by:Roxanne25
ID: 21870421
I tried... its not finding anything... or the tool doesn't allow me to search for a .sql file...

Where does SQL Server store auto recover files?
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:sbagireddi
ID: 21876413
Hmm..that sucks.

As far as I know SQL server does not store any auto recover files, they are stored on the hard drive.
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Author Comment

by:Roxanne25
ID: 21879346
They are actually stored in a backup folder but they aren't historical... There should be some wierd temp directory that it saves the auto recover stuff to though cause it has to do it in case of an improper shut down.  

Oh well, thanks for the help!
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:sbagireddi
ID: 21879649
You are right..this post might help..talks about the temp folder.

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic500268-149-1.aspx
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