[Webinar] Streamline your web hosting managementRegister Today

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1232
  • Last Modified:

Can't Mount Root of SCO Openserver 5.0.6 using NFS in Windows Server 2003

My scenario is that I need to mount the root directory (/) of a SCO OpenServer 5.0.6 using NFS on a Windows Server 2003 R2.  I have installed SFU 3.5.  I have export the / directory on the SCO Server.  I cannot mount it in Windows.  When I try to map a drive to xx.xx.xx.xx:/, it says "The drive could not be mapped because no network was found."  I can successfully mount any other exported directories of the SCO server so I at least know that it NFS does work.  I believe it is a limitation of UNIX Services for Windows, but I may/hopefully am wrong.

Since I couldn't mount the root directory, I then decided to try another way.  I thought I could create a symbolic link to / in hopes that I could then mount in windows as /rootlink, but SCO cannot export a symbolic link.

Any ideas how I can get one of these options to work and/or a different idea on how I can get access to the SCO / directory from the Windows Server?  All help is appreciated!
0
simplemojo
Asked:
simplemojo
  • 3
  • 3
1 Solution
 
mikelfritzCommented:
Try this from (http://www.cactus.com/?p=faq&d=1&display=1027):
Notify your /etc/exports file to allow root access over NFS. On any line you wish to export, you may add one of the following flags to your directory entries in /etc/exports:
For instance, instead of:
/

The file should say:
/ -root=hostname[:hostname]...

Where hostname is the name of a system to be given root permission over NFS. For instance, if system "cactus" needs to mount the root directory of system "medflex" so that the root user on "cactus" has full root file permissions for files on "medflex", then the /etc/exports line of system "medflex" should read:

/ -root=cactus

An alternate method of allowing permissions is to replace the line with:

/ -anon=0

But this can cause a security leak, since ANY user accessing the NFS mounted filesystem will have root read and write permission. The -root flag is usually a better choice:

After changing the /etc/exports file, the system either needs to be restarted or the exportfs program needs to be run to re-export the filesystem information to the NFS daemon.  For this run:

exportfs -av
0
 
simplemojoAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the comment.  I currently have my /etc/exports file as explained above.  It says /-anon=0.  I can mount the root nfs share from another sco or unix machine.  Just not from windows.
0
 
mikelfritzCommented:
Maybe try SAMBA on the SCO box and export it as an SMB share.

http://www.sco.com/skunkware/samba/

For ease set the smb.conf file up with "share" security instead of "user" ("security = share" in the global section) and put in a share section like this:

[root]
        path = /
        writeable = yes
        guest ok = yes
0
Free Tool: Site Down Detector

Helpful to verify reports of your own downtime, or to double check a downed website you are trying to access.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

 
simplemojoAuthor Commented:
I have considered using Samba which will solve the export issue but the reason for the export is backup and recovery purposes.  If I go through Samba, I will not be able to backup the permissions.  It looks like I am going to have to stick to my original plan and run my backup software on a linux server.
0
 
simplemojoAuthor Commented:
Points awarded for helping.  Thanks.
0
 
mikelfritzCommented:
Maybe rsync then.  There are binaries for SCO and Windows:
http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/

Or, could you export a Windows directory and nfs mount it on the SCO box then copy the data to the mount?  That would eliminate the root export issue at least, it would put the onus on the SCO box to run a cron script however.
0

Featured Post

Upgrade your Question Security!

Your question, your audience. Choose who sees your identity—and your question—with question security.

  • 3
  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now