Solved

Open Solaris Split drive into 2 partitions

Posted on 2008-06-25
7
764 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
HI,
I have just installed open solaris on my laptop. it has a 55GB hard disk. Upon install I selected to partition the drive. 15GB for the solaris installation. The remaining 40GB was unallocated or partioned.

I now have a drive that has 40GB free. I am having all sorts of trouble partitoning the freespace and having it as a useable storage drive. Would anyone be able to assist.

apologies for lack of information, first solaris install and im still learning.
Cheers!
0
Comment
Question by:doyle007
7 Comments
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Hanno P.S.
ID: 21872776
If I understand correctly, you created a "Solaris Partiton" with a size of 15 GB
and the remainder of your disk drive is not allocated?

Unfortunately, I am not sure if you can create more than one Solaris partition
on a single drive ...
But you can create a DOS/Windows partition (FAT, not NTFS) and mount it in
Solaris.
0
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Hanno P.S.
ID: 21872782
If you want to use your PC for Solaris only, re-installing and using the whole disk for single Solaris partition might be the best, though.
0
 
LVL 62

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 21873496
So rest is allocated to swap?
0
Active Directory Webinar

We all know we need to protect and secure our privileges, but where to start? Join Experts Exchange and ManageEngine on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 10:00 AM PDT to learn how to track and secure privileged users in Active Directory.

 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Hanno P.S.
ID: 21873778
No, all Solaris stuff is in the Solaris partition

The Solaris partition gets "sub-divided" into Unix slices (sometimes also
called "partitions", which makes things a little weird)

Example:
- You have a disk of 55 GB size
- Create a Solaris partition of 15 GB
- Installing Solaris in that partition, you may get
     - root slice (c0t0d0s0) of 4 GB
     - var slice (c0t0d0s1) of 1 GB
     - swap slice (c0t0d0s3) of 1 GB
     - another slice (c0t0d0s6) for the remaining  9 GB
To see how your disk (Solaris partition in this case) is "sliced", use
    prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2

Depending on your hardware, the disk drive name may be different.
To see the name in your system, use either
   df -kl                  (can do this as ordinary user)
or
   format</dev/null    (only root user can do this)
0
 

Author Comment

by:doyle007
ID: 21880497
JustUNIX - You are correct. I have done exactly that.
I cannot see the reamining 40GB anywhere in the partition table. I can see all the stuff you explain however.
So my question is, where is my 40GB and why cant I do anything with it.

Ie. I created a unix PARTITION by going through

FORMAT > FDISK > Create partition > Unix partition > allocated the reamining 73% of the drive to it.

However, I cant mount that, or see it int he partition table.
I feel as though I am msising a step somewhere....

0
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
Hanno P.S. earned 500 total points
ID: 21882438
If I understand correctly:
- You created a Solaris (Unix) partition during install(size about 23% of the drive)
- Now, you created (from your just-installed Solaris OS) a second Solaris (Unix) partition on the remainder

What does
 format</dev/null
show?

Did you do a reconfigure boot already? If not, do so:
  touch /reconfigure
  init 6
and re-run the format command from above.

Logic would require, that the second partition should appear as a second disk, somehow (?)
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:arthurjb
ID: 21898706
Please post the output of

df -lh

I think that this may be a very simple problem that has been overblown.

All that you have to do is find the solaris identifier for the unused space on the drive, and decide how many slices that you want to make from it.

The above command will show exactly what the drive is being used for.

Thanks
0

Featured Post

Networking for the Cloud Era

Join Microsoft and Riverbed for a discussion and demonstration of enhancements to SteelConnect:
-One-click orchestration and cloud connectivity in Azure environments
-Tight integration of SD-WAN and WAN optimization capabilities
-Scalability and resiliency equal to a data center

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

A metadevice consists of one or more devices (slices). It can be expanded by adding slices. Then, it can be grown to fill a larger space while the file system is in use. However, not all UNIX file systems (UFS) can be expanded this way. The conca…
Installing FreeBSD… FreeBSD is a darling of an operating system. The stability and usability make it a clear choice for servers and desktops (for the cunning). Savvy?  The Ports collection makes available every popular FOSS application and packag…
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
This video shows how to set up a shell script to accept a positional parameter when called, pass that to a SQL script, accept the output from the statement back and then manipulate it in the Shell.

821 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question