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Open Solaris Split drive into 2 partitions

I have just installed open solaris on my laptop. it has a 55GB hard disk. Upon install I selected to partition the drive. 15GB for the solaris installation. The remaining 40GB was unallocated or partioned.

I now have a drive that has 40GB free. I am having all sorts of trouble partitoning the freespace and having it as a useable storage drive. Would anyone be able to assist.

apologies for lack of information, first solaris install and im still learning.
1 Solution
Hanno P.S.IT Consultant and Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
If I understand correctly, you created a "Solaris Partiton" with a size of 15 GB
and the remainder of your disk drive is not allocated?

Unfortunately, I am not sure if you can create more than one Solaris partition
on a single drive ...
But you can create a DOS/Windows partition (FAT, not NTFS) and mount it in
Hanno P.S.IT Consultant and Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
If you want to use your PC for Solaris only, re-installing and using the whole disk for single Solaris partition might be the best, though.
So rest is allocated to swap?
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Hanno P.S.IT Consultant and Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
No, all Solaris stuff is in the Solaris partition

The Solaris partition gets "sub-divided" into Unix slices (sometimes also
called "partitions", which makes things a little weird)

- You have a disk of 55 GB size
- Create a Solaris partition of 15 GB
- Installing Solaris in that partition, you may get
     - root slice (c0t0d0s0) of 4 GB
     - var slice (c0t0d0s1) of 1 GB
     - swap slice (c0t0d0s3) of 1 GB
     - another slice (c0t0d0s6) for the remaining  9 GB
To see how your disk (Solaris partition in this case) is "sliced", use
    prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2

Depending on your hardware, the disk drive name may be different.
To see the name in your system, use either
   df -kl                  (can do this as ordinary user)
   format</dev/null    (only root user can do this)
doyle007Author Commented:
JustUNIX - You are correct. I have done exactly that.
I cannot see the reamining 40GB anywhere in the partition table. I can see all the stuff you explain however.
So my question is, where is my 40GB and why cant I do anything with it.

Ie. I created a unix PARTITION by going through

FORMAT > FDISK > Create partition > Unix partition > allocated the reamining 73% of the drive to it.

However, I cant mount that, or see it int he partition table.
I feel as though I am msising a step somewhere....

Hanno P.S.IT Consultant and Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
If I understand correctly:
- You created a Solaris (Unix) partition during install(size about 23% of the drive)
- Now, you created (from your just-installed Solaris OS) a second Solaris (Unix) partition on the remainder

What does

Did you do a reconfigure boot already? If not, do so:
  touch /reconfigure
  init 6
and re-run the format command from above.

Logic would require, that the second partition should appear as a second disk, somehow (?)
Please post the output of

df -lh

I think that this may be a very simple problem that has been overblown.

All that you have to do is find the solaris identifier for the unused space on the drive, and decide how many slices that you want to make from it.

The above command will show exactly what the drive is being used for.

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