how to perform a windows 2008 backup using a mapped netword drive

Hi I want to perform a backup of windows 2008 using the backup feratures includer with the os(windows server backup ). Unfortunately I haven' a secondary disk to save the data on it. I tryed to save the data using a network drive but it' seem to be impossible. there is away to use a mapped deive as backup's detination?
pozlu0Asked:
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tigermattConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The new Windows Server Backup is very picky about where you can save your backup to, particularly in the awful GUI which Microsoft have provided. There is no longer an Ntbackup facility in Windows Server Backup which is supported for actually running backups.

To backup as a scheduled task to a UNC path, you need to do it directly on the command line. The method I recommend you use is to save the command below into a batch file. This batch file is then configured as the program to run in the Task Scheduler, and it will run the backup on the command line.

wbadmin start backup -backupTarget:\\servername\share\folder -include:C:,D: -allCritical -vssFull -quiet

You will need to change the UNC path in the -backupTarget to the actual share on the remote server which you wish to backup to - and also, ensure that within the share, there is a folder specific to the server being backed up. The backup program will create a custom set of folders within this folder (and create numerous backup files) - the days of a single BKF backup file are long gone!

You also need to add or remove any drive letters after the -include command for all the drives you want to include in the backup.

To run a scheduled backup to a remote network location, you must perform the job on the command line. The GUI has awful support, and does not support network backups on a schedule.

-tigermatt
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A2the6thCommented:
Polz,

You should be able to point to a UNC path (network drive) and backup your server.  If that isn't working I don't know that mapping a drive will do it either.  It sounds more like you have a problem with the utility itself.  As another alternative you could hang a USB drive off the back of the server and back up to that as well.  

My question to you would be what happens when you run the backup to the network?  Are you able to choose a network drive but the backup fails?  Or are you unable to choose the network as a destination?

Cheers
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pozlu0Author Commented:
Thank for your answer!!,
I use the backup wizard to perform a a scheduled backup. Now I choose the backup once  option  backup and I can use the unc path. Can i save this kind of job for sheduled use?
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A2the6thCommented:
So you are able to back up to the network and now you need to save the job so it will continue to run at some given schedule.

Just before you run the job you should see an advanced tab that allows you to step through some additional options. Things like normal, diff, incr backups.  Whether you want to app or over write.  And then you should have a place to schedule the job.  Set the schedule to backup at some point in the future and finish stepping through the wizard.  

Now open your scheduled tasks on the local server and you will see the backup job you just created.  Go into the properties of the task and set the schedule as you would like it to run.

Cheers
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pozlu0Author Commented:
Fast and very accurate thank you very much
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tigermattCommented:
Thanks :-)
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Jean_Claude_ThomasCommented:
Hello, does the CLI command applies to an incremental backup?
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tigermattCommented:
Jean,

You cannot run an incremental backup to a network drive in Windows Server Backup. You can only run a full backup, which, if run to the same path as a previous backup, will overwrite the previous backup.

-Matt
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