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Configuring and adding a Windows Terminal Server to my existing network.

Posted on 2008-06-26
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Last Modified: 2011-09-20
I currently have a Windows 2003 Server D/C with 60 user CALS.  I am going to have to add another server to run Windows Terminal Server.  Here are my questions.
1.  Should I get Server 2008 for the terminal server or should I stay with Windows 2003 Server?
2.  I know I have to buy TSCAL's for the Terminal Server but do I also have to by regular CALS or will the users runiing off the Terminal Server be OK with the CALS on the D/C?
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Question by:krlseidl
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by:rehanahmeds
ID: 21875268
I think you can run it seperately on the other server and keep your DC as license server with existing licenses and so on...

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/howtobuy/licensing/ts2003.mspx


 I dont know what benefit you will get from 2008 terminal services but it wont be much...

you can check this link for 2008 terminal services

http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/library/f6dc3107-81dc-4827-8f07-75241ed351761033.mspx?mfr=true

see if you like any new features or not.... :)

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tigermatt earned 250 total points
ID: 21878645
There are a wealth of new features available in Server 2008's Terminal Services, including the ability to do RemoteApp, a bit like Citrix does. This is one of the most attractive features of Server 2008's Terminal Services, because it enables you to virtualise and run single applications from the Terminal Server, rather than users having to create an entire remote session just to run, in a lot of cases, a single application.

Further, if you get Server 2008 now, you will be in a good position financially for probably at least the next 5 years, if not longer. Server 2008 is the latest Microsoft OS, whereas Server 2003 is going to start being phased out and upgraded in the near future. If you can, I would invest in Server 2008 now, becuase it means you needn't do any more upgrades on this server at least for a long time into the future.

You need to remember that you should test a Server 2008 installation - perhaps in a lab - before even considering purchasing it. You can download evaluation ISOs of Server 2008 from Microsoft's Download Center and mount them in Virtual PC or Virtual Server, to test the OS. If you have an application which doesn't yet work on it, and it would be a major problem to you if it doesn't work, you'll have to either hold fire on the Server 2008 until this application is upgraded to be fully compatible, or go to Server 2003 and then upgrade once the application is patched by the producer.

As for CALs: Bear in mind that no EE Expert can provide legally sound licensing advice, so do take licensing issues on EE carefully. I suggest you check the answer out with Microsoft direct or your licensing provider. But, to the best of my knowledge, if you are running your other servers in per seat (per device/per user) mode, then the regular CALs are going to be used from there, no matter what servers you are using. Only if you are running in per server mode (which is a pointless mode to use in almost all deployments) will you need another set of CALs specifically for your new server.

Remember you will always need Terminal Services CALs.

-tigermatt
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