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Need to resize partition on a Poweredge 2800

Posted on 2008-06-26
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I have a poweredge 2800 running windows sbs 2003 with a hardware RAID 5. I need to resize the c partition, I was wondering if it could be done without any problems.

Thanks
jdff
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Question by:jdff
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by:PUNKY
PUNKY earned 100 total points
ID: 21875964
I would not try to resize the C partition on server, good manage the C drive as the link below:
http://www.lwcomputing.com/tips/static/bootdrivesize.asp
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by:ryansoto
ID: 21876268
While I would first look through that article there are times when you just need more space on the c drive.  I know some people can make it with 10gb on the c drive I couldnt.
I had to clone my disk to a bigger drive instaed of resizing the partition thats a risk deal with a server.
I used Acronis true image server
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 21876449
Ryan, why couldn't you make do with 10GB?  In the article, I do say I'd prefer 16-20 GB... but you can get by with 10... and it's a lot cheaper than Acronis True Image Server ($500).  As I ask everyone... what's taking up the space?  When you look at what's using the space, on almost every server, you can do just fine with 10GB once you make a few adjustments.

(I know it's not your question - but maybe your experiences / practices would make a good exception/footnote to the page).
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by:ryansoto
ID: 21876520
Before i came on board at my current position - the knucklehead admin installed programs on the c partition and unfortunately those programs cant be moved in a simple manner such as rehoming exchange dbases.  Essentially I was stuck and had to move to a bigger drive or repartition.
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by:rjwesley
ID: 21876746
Hmm, might even want to consider a RAID 1 configuration on your 2nd controller (300GB - 10,000 rpm  Ultra320 SCSI drives sound good) and might as well throw in a hotspare in there too - that's if you have the Optional dual channel ROMB (RAID controller), quite possible the embedded controller might work as well. Split Backplane might also be necessary, a bit off topic but something to consider. Why resize when you can spend even more money.

Rob
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by:garycase
ID: 21876989
As long as the RAID is "seen" in the BIOS ... which it should be in this case ... you can easily resize the C: partition using the free demo version of Boot-It NG [http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-next-generation.htm ]

The basic process is simple:

=>  Create a bootable CD or floppy [Download it; extract the files; run BOOTITNG.EXE and select either a floppy or an ISO image; then, if you chose an ISO image, burn the CD]

=>  Boot; select CANCEL at the first prompt; then OK

=>  Go to Partition Work and simply resize the partition AFTER the C: drive to free up some space; "slide" that partition to put the free space next to C:; and then resize C:

Note that if you go to Partition Work and don't "see" the array as a single drive, then Boot-It won't work for you => but with a hardware RAID controller that should not be an issue (and it won't hurt anything to boot to Boot-It and check it)

I wrote a few more details here (also on an SBS2003 system) ... the only difference is that the user in that case purchased and installed Boot-It => works the same, except you always have access to Boot-It for any further partition management needs:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Storage/Misc/Q_21929035.html
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by:jdff
ID: 21881616
So, the final question is, I should be able to resize the partition because it is a hardware managed RAID 5 with 3 drives but the third party software that I will be using will see it as a 1 big drive with 2 partitions and I can tell the software how much space I want to on the C: partition, please confirm that?
'll be using Partition Commander or Bootpart.

Thanks to all of you that is dedicating your time on this.

jdff
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by:garycase
ID: 21881726
As long as the 3rd party tool "sees" one drive, it should work fine.   I KNOW Boot-It works perfectly for this ... there are many examples on EE of folks who have tried other tools that did not [That's why Partition Magic is often referred to here as Partition Tragic].

With Boot-It it's a very straightforward process => ReSize (the 2nd partition);  Slide (the 2nd partiton);  then ReSize (the first partition) ... Done :-)    The pictorial in my last post at the link I gave you above shows you this rather clearly [Here's a direct link to that post:  http://www.experts-exchange.com/Storage/Misc/Q_21929035.html#a17169507 ]

Clearly other utilities will work --> but I'd definitely use Boot-It for its rock-solid stability and reliability.
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by:jdff
ID: 21893148
I have resized the D partition how ever it does not let me increase the size on the C partition, I can see a vacant space in between the partitions. What can I do at this point?

Thanks
jdff
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by:jdff
ID: 21893222
Please look at the image.

thanks
jdff
hardisk.jpg
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garycase earned 400 total points
ID: 21893234
There's no free space between the partitions.    There's free space WITHIN the 2nd partition -- before the volume.   You need to slide the volume to the front of the 2nd partition;  resize the 2nd partition to the size of the volume;  then slide the 2nd partition to the end of the disk (NOW there will be free space between the partitions); and then you can resize C:

If you have any specific questions about how to do this, first post the Boot-It Partition Work screen for that disk [or just type EXACTLY what it shows].
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 21893256
How much time has been spent on this when just reorganizing things could have had you done by now... /unsubscribing....
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by:jdff
ID: 21894359
garycase, where is the volume on that picture? There is 3 partitions on that screen, 1 util, 2 drve c bootable and 3 is the drive d, as I told you I did resize the D partition already. here is the screen from bootit. Could you please help me based on the screen shoot? If I move the volume it should not change the bootable partition right?

leew, I really don't think that 12gb is enough thats why I'm doing this. It took about 4h to free up that space.

thanks a lot
jdff
untitled1.jpg
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by:jdff
ID: 21894556
Well done, I was able to figure it out.

Thanks everyone.
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by:garycase
ID: 21895071
Glad you got it resolved.   Just in case anyone ever finds this discussions with a similar problem, I'll comment on your last questions (I know you've already figured out these answers):

In your display from Disk Management, D: is a logical volume inside of an extended partition that consists of the 12.69GB of free space followed by D: (658.30GB).   This is also shown in the Boot-It display, where MBR Entry 2 is the partition (687100MB), and there is a 674102MB volume within it (the D: drive).

Pictorially, the Boot-It display shows this structure:

DD1111111111111111111222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222

where the D's are the Dell utility partition; the 1's represent MBR Entry 1 (the C: drive); and the 2's represent MBR Entry 2 (the free space followed by the D: drive).

What you need to do is resize the MBR 2 partition ... so the picture looks like this:
DD1111111111111111111222222222222222222222222222222222222222222xxxxxx

... where the x's are unallocated space;  and then "Slide" MBR Entry 2 so the free space is before it; resulting in this:

DD1111111111111111111xxxxxx222222222222222222222222222222222222222222

... and then you can simply ReSize MBR Entry 1  (the C: drive) ==> resulting in this

DD1111111111111111111111111222222222222222222222222222222222222222222
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