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Need to replace motherboard but yet still keep the raid intact

Posted on 2008-06-26
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
have an H8dce that crsahed and have a new one on order for first thing in the morning.  When I swap out the motherboard.  Obviously the onboard raid settings will be wiped clean.  How do I recreate the raid array without destroying the existing one.  

Called Supermicro support and they suggested buying 4 new drives creating a new array.  Power down the system and than putting the old drives back (in the proper order of course).  

Can this be done, or any other suggestions?  very urgent on this!
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Question by:dnscompanies
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by:DenverRick
ID: 21877741
How's your backup?

Usually you can go in and configure the RAID exactly as it was on the old one, assuming you know the settings.  Just make sure, probably test on a single drive you borrow from somewhere, that you have the ability to tell it not to initialize.  If that's the case the system should just run...

Imbedded RAID, yucho...trust LSI Logic like most manufacturers, i.e. Dell, HP, a few others, and ME.

DR
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by:zaheerabbas_8
ID: 21877803
try using recovery software 2 recover it
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by:DenverRick
ID: 21877824
The real kiss-of-death, do that and say bye-bye to your system...
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by:dnscompanies
ID: 21877906
With Raid 5 would the new motherboard Bios see the Raid 5 there?
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DenverRick earned 500 total points
ID: 21877976
The RAID will be blank when you fire it up.  HOWEVER, most later RAID controllers are meant to recognize and existing array if they are blank and something is attached.

Make sure you identify the current connections and put them on the new MB the same way.

Plug it all in and turn it on.  Go into the RAID bios and see if it recognizes it, if it does or shows Orphaned, in which case is should let you pull it in, then your are Golden!
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by:garycase
ID: 21878197
The RAID controller SHOULD recognize the drives and allow you to pull in the orphaned array.   But if that doesn't work you have a dilemma if you don't have a current backup => writing to the drives will dramatically reduce the chances of getting the data off intact.   If you have a current backup, that's not an issue ... just re-create the array, and then reload it from your backup.

... but if you don't have a current backup, you may want to build an entirely new array using new disks; and then connect the old disks independently (NOT as an array) and restore the data using RAID Reconstructor [http://www.runtime.org/raid.htm ], which will easily recover the data and copy it to the new array.

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by:PaperTiger
ID: 21878351
most of RAID controller will see the drives have RAID configuration and allow that configuration to be copied from the drives to the controllers.

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by:grubv
ID: 21889548
RAID configuration details will be stored in onboard RAID controller as well as on the HDD's. So ideally if the motherboad is replaced then the new board should be able to detect configuration from the HDD's.
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Author Closing Comment

by:dnscompanies
ID: 31471118
Appreciate the quick respone on this.  Just as you said it recognized once the MB was replaced.  
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