Photoshop and Bridge missing functionality for RAW files (.CR2)

I have the Adobe CS3 Master Collection installed on my Windows XP Service Pack 2 machine, and about a month ago, my Bridge and Photoshop applications somehow lost their ability to work with Camera Raw files, specifically .CR2. When viewed in Bridge, the files produce no thumbnails nor are you provided any of the usual options associated with raw files, the program simply doesn't know how to handle them. Even worse, they won't even open in Photoshop, and upon attempting, I recieve an error message that says, "Could not complete your request because it is not the right type of document."

When I was first using my new CS3 applications, the raw functionality was intact (and great, much better than CS2), it simply seems that it was somehow crippled along the way. Reinstalling either application has yielded no success.

I've even tried going back and using my old CS2 versions of Bridge and Photoshop, and they work fine! Why would my newer apps all of a sudden lose this capability?
andythesavageAsked:
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David BruggeConnect With a Mentor Commented:
It's obvious that your Camera Raw plug-in has become corrupted. Like you, I would expect a reinstall to fix it.

Your old CS2 programs handle the RAW files because they are in a different folder than your CS3 versions. (and no, you can copy them over)

I would go here and download a fresh copy of the Camera Raw plugin:
http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=3896

Then  navigate to    Program Files \ Common Files \ Adobe \ Plug-Ins \ CS3 \ File Formats...
 
and delete the existing Camera Raw.8bi plug-in

Then copy the Camera Raw plug-in, Camera Raw.8bi, from the download into the same plug-Ins folder that the original Camera Raw plug-in was in.

Then keep your fingers crossed while you relaunch PS
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andythesavageAuthor Commented:
Man, you must work for Adobe or something. Great stuff man, keep it up.
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andythesavageAuthor Commented:
Great, that worked.

The really strange thing is when I navigated to the Plug-Ins folder, I saw three folders:
CS2  <-- contained plug-in
CS3  <-- EMPTY
CS3 (2)  <-- contained plug-in

I simply copied the file from CS3(2) into the CS3 folder, booted Photoshop, and it worked. Very strange for the system to be keeping copies of critical files in improperly named folders, though. Perhaps a symptom of too many reinstalls. This may be why my CS3 software has been giving me so much trouble, as it could be occurring with many other of these Adobe files and directories throughout my hard drive. Any ideas as to what may have caused this and how to root out more of these problems, should they exist?
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David BruggeCommented:
Thanks, but I don't work for Adobe. I just work with their products enough to have had  lots of things go wrong. That way, when I see a problem I can say "yeah, the same thing happened to me."

However I must say that I don't remember the installer making a new install and giving it a sequence number. It wouldn't be a bad idea to deactivate your copy of Photoshop and completely un-install it.

The problem is that the uninstall files will only point to one installation of Photoshop and it may or may not remove all of the important references in the registry. However the uninstaller doesn't remove ALL of the references. For that, refer to this:

http://www.adobe.com/go/kb401492

Although the link refers to the Beta program, according to Adobe, it references to the same files as the full version.

Hope that this solves all of your problems.

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