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mattolanFlag for Canada

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Is is possible to restore a laptop battery?

We have a large number of laptop all equiped with dual batteries. these laptops are used in the field almost entirely off battery. when new they got close to 7 hours battery life, but know that they are between 1 - 2 years old some only get 2 hours at the best.

Is is possible to restore a laptop battery somehow so that it can hold a full charge like a new battery?

I know if they where multi cell lead acid batteries for example you could do what is called an equalization charge to balance all of the cells in the battery again, effectively making it like new.
or if it was a lead acid car battery you can usually use a process called De-sulfating to restore the to like new condition.
Does anyone know of anything similar that can be done with Lithuim Ion laptop batteries?

I would really prefere not to have to replace them all as this would cost close to $9000 (60+ batteries @ about $150 each) and would only last for 1-2 years before I would have to do it again, also I hate throwing things out if they can be fixed.
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tplaya07
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wmball

There is no procedure which will restore discharge capacity to older lithium batteries.  As they age, lithium batteries build up internal resistance that prevents them from delivering full capacity under the high load conditions present in laptop devices.  The rate at which this problem develops depends on usage conditions.  High heat (e.g., laptop storage in a hot car, running laptop on AC power with the battery installed) and full discharge cycles accelerate this deterioration.  Avoiding these conditions will extend battery life, but once the internal resistance has increased, it cannot be reversed.

Note, however, that it is common for the battery charge metering system to become less accurate over time and report shorter expected remaining discharge times.  This can be "recalibrated" by a full charge/discharge cycle.  While I indicated above that lithium ion batteries do not like routine full discharge, periodic full discharge may appear to restore batteries by resetting the metering system.

Lithium batteries may no longer accept any charge after becoming excessively discharged from prolonged periods of disuse.   This activates an internal charge/discharge protection circuit and the batteries become unusable.
Simple explanation is the internal resistance of the battery just keeps on growing over the years.

Some may say that you can try to expand the battery life by "shocking" the battery (directly inducing a DC current directly to the battery terminals with a voltage slightly larger than the batteries' actual output)

Aleghart is right. You might as well buy a new battery.