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ebyrneFlag for United States of America

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Motherboard/Cpu/Memory compatibility

Hi Experts,

I was hoping you could help me with a quick sanity check on compatibility/potential performance issue for the following three components:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231166
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131299
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115042

So:
1. Are they completely compatible? Any potential issue?
2. What is lost by have 1066 memory as opposed to the maximum 1200 that the board supports? Is there a porportional access time, or is it potentially worse? I didn't see much in the way of 1200, which is why I ended up with 1066. Any thoughts?
3. What are the defining cpu characteristics that ensure a processor is fully compatible with a motherboard? What should you look for in general? (And more specifically, any issues here?)
4. Any upgrade/downgrade suggestions?

Thanks!
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Gary Case
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A follow-up comment:  I noted that CPU support isn't an issue ... and it's not.   But for your future reference, if you ever decide to upgrade (that board supports the future-generation Nehalem CPU's) ... be SURE that you check CPU compatibility before ordering a CPU ... AND that if it requires a specific BIOS, you do the BIOS upgrade BEFORE you switch CPU's.   Since every CPU on the current list requires BIOS rev 205, it's safe to assume the board is shipping with that BIOS (or later).   But in the future, as support for newer CPUs is added, they will require a newer BIOS.   A fairly common issue with upgraders is that they either (a) assume a board supports a CPU and just buy it -- only to learn it's not supported; or (b) they're wise enough to check the CPU Support List and are "sure" it supports a CPU -- only to find out that they didn't notice the requirement for a newer BIOS than they have.   In the latter case, you have to remove the new CPU; re-install the old one; flash the BIOS update; and THEN switch back to the new CPU.    ... clearly it's a lot easier if you simply update the BIOS first :-)