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What is a TCP Window Update?

Posted on 2008-09-29
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I'm writing a web service client and I'm getting a lot of TCP Window Update packets in my Wireshark capture.  What are they and are they bad?

Thanks!
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Question by:pbenito
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8 Comments
 
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by:bhnmi
ID: 22599341
Can you post the packet? Most likely its just chatter  to the MS update server, but I am not sure.
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by:pbenito
ID: 22599516
Frame 3881 (60 bytes on wire, 60 bytes captured)
Transmission Control Protocol, Src Port: http (80), Dst Port: tapestry (1922), Seq: 1, Ack: 2778606, Len: 0
    Source port: http (80)
    Destination port: tapestry (1922)
    Sequence number: 1    (relative sequence number)
    Acknowledgement number: 2778606    (relative ack number)
    Header length: 20 bytes
    Flags: 0x10 (ACK)
    Window size: 65535
    Checksum: 0x91ac [correct]
    [SEQ/ACK analysis]
        [TCP Analysis Flags]
            [This is a tcp window update]
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by:bhnmi
ID: 22599530
I believe that is web traffic.
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by:pbenito
ID: 22599540
What does it mean?
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bhnmi earned 500 total points
ID: 22599561
Frame 3881 (60 bytes on wire, 60 bytes captured)
Transmission Control Protocol, Src Port: http (80), Dst Port: tapestry (1922), Seq: 1, Ack: 2778606, Len: 0
    Source port: http (80)
    Destination port: tapestry (1922)
    Sequence number: 1    (relative sequence number)
    Acknowledgement number: 2778606    (relative ack number)
    Header length: 20 bytes
    Flags: 0x10 (ACK)
    Window size: 65535
    Checksum: 0x91ac [correct]
    [SEQ/ACK analysis]
        [TCP Analysis Flags]
            [This is a tcp window update]


The destination port says tapestry.

http://tapestry.apache.org/
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Expert Comment

by:tcrick
ID: 22890155
Do you see TCP ZeroWindow and/or TCP Zero_WindowProbe?
It means one side of the communications receive buffer was full and could not receive anymore data.  It thens sends a zero window, the other side then sends a zero window probe to see if the window is still in the zero window state.  Then zero window updates are sent to renegotiate the window size.
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Author Comment

by:pbenito
ID: 22891628
Thanks!  
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Expert Comment

by:JasonMewes
ID: 23203492
The tcp window specifies how much data can be in transit.

One way of looking at it is a method to let the "sender" know how much buffer space is available at the "receivers" end so that the sender does not send more data than the receiver can handle.

Window updates are usually performed as part of "normal" packet that contains data. Every time a tcp packet goes back from the receiving end it includes it's current window size/buffer space available so essentially every tcp packet is also a window update (although it is not marked as such).

However, on a (mostly) unidirectional connection (ie, data only flows in one direction) the receiver has no "normal" outgoing packets. It will still have to let the sender know of it's window size, because otherwise the sender will eventually think that the receivers buffers are full.

These updates are called window updates and are essentially a tcp packet that has no data and is sent with no other purpose than to let the sender know that the space available in the receivers buffer has increased.

Depending on your implementation they may anything from completely legit to a slight waste of bandwidth. Likely the former.
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