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How would you write a query to find the records in 1 table that don't exist in another table ?

Posted on 2008-09-29
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Last Modified: 2013-12-05
I am developing an Access application using Access as the front end and SQL Server as the back end database. I use the following query to yield a result set of matching records.

How would you rewrite the following query to:
 
find the records in ztbl_Source_SSFIII THAT DO NOT EXIST in ztbl_Master_Template
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SELECT a.id, a.[Fund Name], b.[Investor Name], b.[Legal Entity]
FROM ztbl_Master_Template a
INNER JOIN ztbl_Source_SSFIII b ON b.[Investor Name] = a.[Account Name]  AND
a.[Legal Entity] LIKE '%' + b.[Legal Entity] + '%'
where [Fund Name] = 'Special Situations Fund III'
order by id
0
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Question by:zimmer9
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5 Comments
 
LVL 143

Expert Comment

by:Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]
ID: 22599744
this will do:
SELECT a.id, a.[Fund Name], b.[Investor Name], b.[Legal Entity]
FROM ztbl_Source_SSFIII b 
LEFT JOIN ztbl_Master_Template a
  ON b.[Investor Name] = a.[Account Name]  
  AND a.[Legal Entity] LIKE '%' + b.[Legal Entity] + '%' 
  AND a.[Fund Name] = 'Special Situations Fund III'
WHERE a.id IS NULL

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0
 

Author Comment

by:zimmer9
ID: 22599924
If I perform the following query:

select count(*) from ztbl_Source_SSFIII

the result of the record count is 966 rows.
---------------------------------------------------
As a result of the following query, the result set is 724 rows:

SELECT a.id, a.[Fund Name], b.[Investor Name], b.[Legal Entity]
FROM ztbl_Master_Template a
INNER JOIN ztbl_Source_SSFIII b ON b.[Investor Name] = a.[Account Name]  AND
a.[Legal Entity] LIKE '%' + b.[Legal Entity] + '%'
where [Fund Name] = 'Special Situations Fund III'
order by id
-----------------------------------------------------------------

As a result of the following query, the result set is 243 rows:

SELECT a.id, a.[Fund Name], b.[Investor Name], b.[Legal Entity]
FROM ztbl_Source_SSFIII b
LEFT JOIN ztbl_Master_Template a
  ON b.[Investor Name] = a.[Account Name]  
  AND a.[Legal Entity] LIKE '%' + b.[Legal Entity] + '%'
  AND a.[Fund Name] = 'Special Situations Fund III'
WHERE a.id IS NULL
----------------------------------------------------------------
Thus, the record count of 966 rows is 1 less than the result of the 2 queries (724 rows + 243 rows).

Any thoughts on how I can reconcile the 1 record difference ?

0
 
LVL 143

Accepted Solution

by:
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3] earned 500 total points
ID: 22599995
that's usually a NULL value in either legal entity or fund name?
0
 

Author Comment

by:zimmer9
ID: 22600997
Could it also be due to 2 matching records in ztbl_Master_Template for 1 record
ztbl_Source_SSFIII ?
0
 
LVL 143

Expert Comment

by:Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]
ID: 22601048
yes, possibly.
0

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