The purpose of Having TERMINAL SERVERS?

Hi,

1) A friend asked me
2) What is the FUNCTION or the PURPOSE of having Terminal Servers  in Active Directory Environment (Pls explain it in relationship with The Domain Controller, File Servers, etc)
3) Thank you

Tjie
tjieAsked:
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Andres PeralesCommented:
Well there is always for Remote Administration option...
then there is for application utilization, and of course you can have what we would call thin clients out on your network connecting back to terminal servers that would be providing operating systems and applications to the user.
Instead of updating every single desktop in your enviroment, you would only have to update that one terminal server image.
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bhnmiCommented:
A terminal server lets you have remote and local user connect to it and utilize the applications installed on it.

A terminal server does not have to be in AD and if it was its relationship with the DC would be that of anyother computer account. It processes authentication and group policy. You could use the file server for storage or profiles, but these are all optional.
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ryansotoCommented:
Lets you run internal applications from inside or outside the organzation
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Brian PiercePhotographerCommented:
Terminal server lets users - possibly from remote locations - work on the domain, in the same way as they would if they were in the office. Terminal server (unlike remote desktop), supports muliple users each working in their own unique session.

As with any domain computer the Domain Controller is responsible for authenication the users on the domain and granting them access to domain resources.

File servers are essentially machines which hold the data which users can access.

It is possible the these three roles are all on the same machine, though it is recommended that a Domain Controller is not a terminal server due to the security implications (and is actually prohibited on an SBS server)
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aleghartCommented:
Is your friend trying to do homework or a test?  This sounds like a badly-worded pop-quiz.

The Terminal Server has little or no necessary relationship to a Domain Controller or Active Directory structure.  It doesn't need one.  It's handy for authentication and user profile management...but you can run TS on a standalone server without Active Directory.

Function, relating to a Domain Controller or AD?:  none.  Incidental that you can use TS to administer a DC for up to two admin sessions.

Purpose, relating to a DC or AD?:  see above.
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tjieAuthor Commented:
1) When we connect to Terminal Server
2) Can we Create, delete or reset password of users?
3) Can we see the Network Drives (such as P: drive) and add or delete the folders or files in it?
4) Can we Reboot the terminal server itself Remotely?

Thanks,
Tjie
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Brian PiercePhotographerCommented:
2 - yes - if you have admin permissions
3 - yes - if you have the necessary permissions
4 - yes - if you have the necessary permissions
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aleghartCommented:
> 3) Can we see the Network Drives (such as P: drive) and add or delete the folders or files in it?

Mapping network drives is dependent on the user profile.  It is not specific to the server to which one is connected.

If you log in to a DC as an administrator, that profile may not have \\host\share mapped to P:\ drive.
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