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Posted on 2008-09-29
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Have three computers and a server behind a linksys router and switch. Would you assign static IP's to every computer in the LAN?
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Question by:gflasset
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by:silemone
ID: 22601624
Either static or dynamic will work fine in this situation.
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by:kukno
ID: 22601626
Yes. Because with 3 PCs it's really not much work. You could also use the DHCP server on the linksys router, however if you want to access any of the other machines you will have to look up the ip address, as this can change when using DHCP.

Regards
Kurt
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by:whega
ID: 22601641
That really depends on what your intended use for the computers are. Your server should definately have a static IP. But unless you connect to the other PC's from outside your linksys box, I fail to see any benifit (I am assuming that linksys has a dhcp server built in). Maybe more info on what you are trying to achieve would help answer the question better.
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aleghart earned 500 total points
ID: 22601699
Yes and No.

No...do not assign public IP addresses.

Yes...static private IP addresses are fairly easy to remember in small networks.

Your linksys router should have a WAN interface for the wide-area network.
The remainder of the ports are LAN for the local-area network.

The router will pick up a public IP address for the WAN interface.
A new non-routable subnet will be assigned to your LAN interface.
Usually this looks like 192.168.x.x

So, you can number your computers, printers, etc. manually:

Router: 192.168.1.1

Comp1: 192.168.1.11
Comp2: 192.168.1.12
Comp3: 192.168.1.13

Printer1: 192.168.1.51
Printer2: 192.168.1.52

do not use (reserved for broadcast): 192.168.1.255
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by:aleghart
ID: 22601720
Be aware that you must configure all network settings manually for every device, including network printers, cameras, TiVo, etc.

Gateway will be your router: 192.168.1.1
DNS will be provided by your ISP, or you can choose your own
Primary DNS:  4.2.2.1
Secondary DNS: 4.2.2.2

Once you get beyond 2-3 devices, DHCP makes much more sense.

From there, you can still reserve (assign) fixed IP addresses.  The advantage is that you only have to configure network settings in one place...at the router.

To assign fixed IP addresses with DHCP, you'll need the MAC address of the network interface on each computer/device.  If you need help with this, just ask.
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