Solved

Terminal Services Idle Session Time-Out

Posted on 2008-09-30
1
1,465 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-21
I have a remote user logging into a server via terminal services and each time she is idle for 5 minutes it kicks her off. I've changed the idle session time out in terminal services configuration and in the local policy on our machine as well as on her machine and it still kicks her off after 5 minutes of inactivity. Help?
0
Comment
Question by:mwagoner_73
1 Comment
 
LVL 31

Accepted Solution

by:
Henrik Johansson earned 500 total points
ID: 22609260
Check with rsop.msc if there's any domain-based GPO applying the policy setting and overrides the local policy/configuration.
0

Featured Post

Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

##the calculator has been updated to version 1.6 please download the use the updated version## Hi there, After the previous post of the original version of the calculator here : http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/OS/Microsoft_Operatin…
Remote Desktop Protocol or RDP has become an essential tool in many offices. This article will show you how to set up an external IP to point directly to an RDP session. There are many reasons why this is beneficial but perhaps the top reason is con…
This is used to tweak the memory usage for your computer, it is used for servers more so than workstations but just be careful editing registry settings as it may cause irreversible results. I hold no responsibility for anything you do to the regist…
Learn how to create flexible layouts using relative units in CSS.  New relative units added in CSS3 include vw(viewports width), vh(viewports height), vmin(minimum of viewports height and width), and vmax (maximum of viewports height and width).

867 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

12 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now