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floating point addition and multiplication not necessarily associative.

Posted on 2008-09-30
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
(a) Give an example to show that floating point addition is not necessarily associative.
(b) Give an example to show that floating point multiplication is not necessarily associative.
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Question by:panaz
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12 Comments
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 22610072
(FLT_EPSILON + FLT_EPSILON) + 2
FLT_EPSILON + (FLT_EPSILON + 2)


FLT_MAX * (FLT_MAX * FLT_MIN)
(FLT_MAX * FLT_MAX) * FLT_MIN
0
 

Author Comment

by:panaz
ID: 22610091
FLT_EPSILON : is this a standard global constant in C/ C++?
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 22610099
(FLT_EPSILON + 2.5) + -2.5  
FLT_EPSILON + (2.5 + -2.5)
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 22610189
FLT_EPSILON is in
#include <float.h>
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Author Comment

by:panaz
ID: 22610195
thanks
0
 

Author Comment

by:panaz
ID: 22610277
#include<float.h>
#include<iostream>

using namespace std;
int main()
{
float a,b,c,d;

a = (FLT_EPSILON + 2.5) + -2.5 ;
b = FLT_EPSILON + (2.5 + -2.5);

cout<<"a :"<<a<<endl;

cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;



return 0;
}


csci>a.out
a :1.19209e-07
b :1.19209e-07


0
 

Author Comment

by:panaz
ID: 22610281
a and b have the same values here. looks like it dont work?
0
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 22610440
You are probably doing double precision arithmetic
try

a =  (FLT_EPSILON + 2.5);
cout<<"a :"<<a<<endl;
b = a + -2.5;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;
c = 2.5;
d = -2.5;
a = (FLT_EPSILON + c) + d;
cout<<"a :"<<a<<endl;
b = (float)(FLT_EPSILON + 2.5) + -2.5;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;
b =(FLT_EPSILON + 2.5f) + -2.5f;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;
0
 

Author Comment

by:panaz
ID: 22610472
I guess its still the same values:

int main()
{
double a,b,c,d;

a =  (FLT_EPSILON + 2.5);
cout<<"a :"<<a<<endl;
b = a + -2.5;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;
c = 2.5;
d = -2.5;
a = (FLT_EPSILON + c) + d;
cout<<"a :"<<a<<endl;

b = (float)(FLT_EPSILON + 2.5) + -2.5;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;

b =(FLT_EPSILON + 2.5f) + -2.5f;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;

return 0;

}

 [ Wrote 28 lines ]

csci>g++ test.cpp
csci>a.out
a :2.5
b :1.19209e-07
a :1.19209e-07
b :0
b :0
0
 
LVL 84

Accepted Solution

by:
ozo earned 250 total points
ID: 22610562
You changed
float a,b,c,d;
to
double a,b,c,d;
For doubles, use DBL_EPSILON instead of FLT_EPSILON
0
 

Author Comment

by:panaz
ID: 22610575
okay
0
 

Author Comment

by:panaz
ID: 22610628
#include<float.h>
#include<iostream>
#include<limits>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
float a,b,c,d;

a =  (FLT_EPSILON + 2.5);
cout<<"a :"<<a<<endl;
b = a + -2.5;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;

c = 2.5;
d = -2.5;
a = (FLT_EPSILON + c) + d;
cout<<"a :"<<a<<endl;

b = (float)(FLT_EPSILON + 2.5) + -2.5;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;

b =(FLT_EPSILON + 2.5f) + -2.5f;
cout<<"b :"<<b<<endl;


return 0;

}


csci>g++ test.cpp
csci>a.out
a :2.5
b :0
a :0
b :0
b :0
0

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